Scouting Terms and Jargon

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Here you can learn some of Scouting's jargon, abbreviations, initials, words, etc. you hear at Scouting events.

Able
Next-to-the-highest rank in Sea Scouting, awarded to registered Sea Scouts who have met the requirements. Combinations: "Able Award," "Able rank," "Able requirements," "Able Sea Scout."

Academics program, Academics pin, Academics belt loop
See "Cub Scout Academics and Sports program."

achievement
The name given to a major requirement in Cub Scouting. There are achievements for the Tiger Cub, Wolf, and Bear ranks. Capitalize only when writing about a specific achievement: "Feats of Skill, Wolf Achievement 1"; "Bear achievement."

activity badge
One of 20 specialized recognitions earned by Webelos Scouts. Capitalize the name of the badge only. Example: "Earn the Aquanaut and Sportsman activity badges."

activity badge counselor
An adult, noncommissioned volunteer who counsels a Webelos Scout on one or more of the activity badges.

activity chair
A Venturer appointed by the crew Advisor and president to chair a crew activity or project.

A.D., B.C.
Use small capitals. The abbreviated A.D. for anno Domini (in the year of the Lord) goes before the figure for the year: A.D. 96.

addresses
Use the abbreviations "Ave.," "Blvd.," and "St." only with a numbered address: "1600 Pennsylvania Ave." Spell them out and capitalize when part of a formal street name without a number: "He lived on Pennsylvania Avenue." All similar words (alley, drive, lane, road, terrace, etc.) are always spelled out. Capitalize them when part of a formal name without a number; lowercase when used alone or with two or more names: "They lived on Penny Lane." "He lived near the intersection of Scripture and Panhandle streets."

Adirondack Adventure Area
An association of 14 BSA councils has developed and operates this unique high-adventure program in the more than 6-million-acre Adirondack State Park in New York. Mailing address: Adirondack Adventure Area; Northeast Region, BSA; P.O. Box 350; Dayton, NJ 08810.

Adult Mentor program
Adult mentors work with young people enrolled in the God and Country program. An adult who completes the mentor studies receives a certificate and lapel pin to wear on nonuniform clothing.

adult partner
The adult member of a Tiger Cub team.

Advanced Seamanship
This Sea Scouting course is designed for those who have completed the Safe Boating course. Those who complete it earn the Qualified Seaman bar.

advancement
The process by which a member meets certain requirements and earns recognition.

adviser
Use this spelling when describing a counselor other than a Venturing Advisor. Example: "Order of the Arrow lodge adviser."

Advisor
The top adult leader of a Venturing crew who is responsible for program, coordination, and the training of the elected youth officers of the crew or ship. The Advisor or Skipper is appointed by the crew or ship committee, approved by the chartered organization, and commissioned, upon approval of the registration, by the Boy Scouts of America. Advisors must be 21 years of age, be citizens or legal residents of the United States, accept the BSA Declaration of Religious Principle (see "Religious Principle, Declaration of"), and be of high moral character. All adult positions in Venturing are open to men and women.

Advisory Council
The Advisory Council to the National Executive Board is composed of nonvoting members of the National Council who, because of experience, have a particular expertise that would benefit the national movement. They are elected to National Advisory Council membership by a two-thirds vote of the Executive Board members present at any meeting.

ages
Always use figures; note the use of hyphens: a 6-year-old girl; she is 6 years old; he is a 3-year-old. When the context does not require "years" or "years old," the figure is presumed to be years.

Aims of Scouting
They are character development, citizenship training, and mental and physical fitness.

Akela
(Pronounced Ah-KAY-la.) A title of respect used in Cub Scouting—any good leader is Akela. Akela is also the leader and guide for Cub Scouts on the Wolf trail. The name comes from Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Book. See "Law of the Pack."

alliance
See "Scout Executives' Alliance."

Alpha Phi Omega
A coeducational service fraternity organized in many of the colleges and universities of America. It was founded on the principles of the BSA and Scout Oath and Law.

alumni family members
Individuals, previously registered with the Boy Scouts of America, who wish to continue to identify with the BSA's ideals, values, and program.

Alumni Family News
A national publication sent to alumni members several times per year. It provides both nostalgic and current information.

A.M., P.M. Use small caps, with periods. Also see "times and time zones."

American Humanics Inc.
A nonprofit organization that provides curricula and support to selected universities and colleges for the development and certification of potential professionals for nonprofit, human service organizations.

American Indian
This term is preferred to "Native American" when referring to indigenous people of the continental United States. "Native American" more generally applies to also include native peoples of the Hawaiian Islands, Alaska, Puerto Rico, and Guam. When possible, be precise and use the name of a specific tribe.

Anniversary Week
See "Scouting Anniversary Week."

annual
An event cannot be described as "annual" until it has been held in at least two successive years. Do not use the term "first annual." Instead, note that sponsors plan to hold an event annually.

Annual Giving Campaign (AGC)
An opportunity for National Council employees and selected national-level prospects to provide financial support for national operations. Also see "Friends of Scouting."

annual meeting
These meetings are held to elect officers, hear reports of the year's activities, and study plans for the coming year. Capitalize only when naming a specific meeting. Example: "Fairfield Council Annual Meeting." See also "National Annual Meeting."

apostrophe

  • Use an apostrophe to form possessives. See "possessives."
  • Omitted letters and figures: "the class of '62," "rock 'n' roll," "don't." A typographical note when one is using word processors: Watch out for the incorrect use of a left single quote rather than an apostrophe if your word processor is typing "smart" or "curly" quotes! Word processors aren't that smart.
  • Plurals of single letters: "Mind your p's and q's"; "the three R's of Youth Protection."

colon.

  • Use a colon in some cases to introduce lists: "The backpack contained the following items: a tent, a stove, and food." However, note that the colon is not necessary when the list "runs into" the rest of the sentence: "The backpack contained a tent, a stove, and food." See "lists."
  • Colons introduce direct quotations longer than one sentence.
  • Colons are used for emphasis: "He had one hobby: eating."

comma.

  • In a series (the "serial comma"): Use commas to separate elements in a series, including before the concluding conjunction. Example: "The flag is red, white, and blue."
  • With equal adjectives: Adjectives are "equal" if the comma separating them can be replaced with the word and without the meaning changing. Example: "the tall, dark stranger."

dash. See "em dash" and "en dash." The en dash is half the length of an em dash and longer than a hyphen. (em dash: — en dash: – hyphen: -)

appendix
When referencing the book's appendix within the text, it is not capitalized.

Apprentice
The entrance rank in Sea Scouting. Combinations: "Apprentice Award," "Apprentice Sea Scout," "Apprentice rank," "Apprentice requirements."

Aquatics Instructor BSA
See "BSA Aquatics Instructor."

area
An administrative section of a BSA region containing a number of councils. Regions have from five to eight areas. Combinations: "Area 2," "areawide."

area codes
The preferred style is to use a period with the area code rather than parentheses or hyphen: 972.580.2000.  THis is done since all phone numbers are ten (10) digits now.

area president
The ranking elected volunteer officer in an area (noncommissioned) who heads the area committee and serves as a member of the regional cabinet.

arena show
A series of exciting and dramatic displays of Cub Scout, Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, and Venturing skills and talents put on by the members themselves for a seated audience. See also "booth show."

Armenian Church of America
The term encompasses two independent dioceses (Eastern and Western) that cooperate in some activities.

Armenian Committee on Scouting
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the Armenian Church of America and the Boy Scouts of America.

Arrow of Light Award
The highest rank in Cub Scouting and the only Cub Scout badge that may be worn on the Boy Scout uniform.

Arrow Point
An award for earning 10 elective credits as a Wolf or Bear Cub Scout: The first 10 electives earned in either rank are represented by a Gold Arrow Point; subsequent groups of 10 earn Silver Arrow Points.

Arrowhead Honor
A recognition given to Commissioners who have completed specific training projects. Combinations: "Arrowhead Honor Award," "Arrowhead Honor projects."

Arrowman
A youth or adult member of the Order of the Arrow. Plural is Arrowmen.

Assistant Cubmaster
A volunteer Scouter, 18 or older, appointed by the chartered organization to help the Cubmaster.

assistant den leader
A volunteer Scouter, 18 or older, appointed by the chartered organization to help the Cub Scout den leader.  Formerly a Den Mother.

assistant denner
A Cub Scout or Webelos Scout elected by his peers to help the denner.

assistant patrol leader
A Boy Scout who is appointed by the patrol leader to help him and to take his place in his absence.

assistant Scoutmaster
A volunteer Scouter, 18 or older, appointed by the chartered organization to help the Scoutmaster by working with a new-Scout patrol, Varsity Scout team, or Venture patrol.

assistant senior patrol leader
A troop youth leader, usually in larger troops, who helps the senior patrol leader. Appointed by the senior patrol leader with the Scoutmaster's advice and consent.

assistant Webelos den leader
A leader in a pack, at least 18 years of age, who is appointed by the chartered organization to help the Webelos den leader.

associate Advisor, Venturing
Each Venturing crew or Sea Scout ship should have one or more adults, 21 years of age or older, who perform such duties as may be assigned by the Advisor. Associate Advisors often are assigned administrative and program functions. An associate Advisor in a Sea Scout ship is called a "mate."

Association of Baptists for Scouting
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between Baptist churches and the Boy Scouts of America.

astronaut
It is not a formal title. Do not capitalize when used before a name: "astronaut Jim Lovell."

at-risk
An ill-defined term that should be avoided.

award
Capitalize only when referring to the name of a specific award: "the Arrow of Light Award."

Award of Merit
A recognition for Scouters who give noteworthy service to youth at the district level. See "National President's Scoutmaster Award of Merit."

awards and decorations
Capitalize them: "Honor Medal," "Heroism Award," "Medal of Merit," etc. However, do not capitalize "emblem" (see "emblem"). See individual names of medals, honors, and emblems.

awards of merit
See "Award of Merit" and "National President's Scoutmaster Award of Merit."

Baden-Powell, Robert Stephenson Smyth
Founder of the worldwide Scouting movement. Born February 22, 1857, in London. Made a baron in 1929. He is referred to as Lord Baden-Powell of Gilwell, Chief Scout of the World. Died January 8, 1941. Abbreviate to B-P (without periods).

Baden-Powell World Fellowship
This program of the World Scout Foundation recognizes individuals for their financial support of world Scouting. See "World Scout Foundation."

badge
Usually lowercase when referred to badges that Scouts can earn: "Webelos activity badge," "Wolf badge," "Boy Scout badge," "merit badge"; however, "Wood Badge."

Baha'i, Baha'is, Bahaism
This faith began in Persia in the 1840s; the principal prophet is Baha'u'llah.

Baha'i Committee on Scouting
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the Baha'i faith and the Boy Scouts of America.

Baloo
(Pronounced Bah-LOO.) The friendly bear in Kipling's Jungle Book taught Mowgli the ways of the jungle. Parents and adult guides act as Baloo for Cub Scouts on the Bear trail in the same way they took the part of Akela for Cub Scouts on the Wolf trail.

Band-Aid
A trademark for a type of adhesive bandage. Use the generic term "adhesive bandage." See "trademarks."

Baptist churches
Do not apply the term "church" to any Baptist unit except the local church. There are more than 20 Baptist bodies in the United States, the largest being the Southern Baptist Convention.

B.C.
Use small capitals. The abbreviated B.C. for "before Christ" is placed after the figure for the year: 100 B.C.

Bear
The rank designed for a Cub Scout in the third grade (or 9 years old). Combinations: "Bear achievements," "Bear badge," "Bear Cub Scout," "Bear electives," "Bear trail."

Beaumont Scout Reservation
A Scout Reservation in High Ridge, MO.  Named in 1947 for Louis D. Beaumont.

Benchmark
One of several critical planning issues defined by the National Council for local council long-range strategic plans. Note the capitalization. The Benchmarks are found in the publication Local Council Strategic Planning—Benchmarks for Success. Also see "critical issues," "Strategic Plan, National."

Be Prepared
The Scout motto. The initials of the motto are the initials of Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting.

biannual, biennial
Biannual means twice a year and is a synonym for the word "semiannual." "Biennial" means every two years.

big idea
Obsolete as of June 2001. Formerly: Tiger Cub activities were grouped into themes, called "big ideas," in the Tiger Cubs BSA Family Activity Book. Capitalize when referring to a specific big idea: "Big Idea 17."

Bill of Rights
The first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

bimonthly
Means every other month. "Semimonthly" means twice a month.

biweekly
Means every other week. "Semiweekly" means twice a week.

blue and gold banquet
A birthday dinner for Scouting held by Cub Scout packs in February to celebrate the founding of the Boy Scouts of America in 1910 and of Cub Scouting in 1930. May be called "blue and gold dinner." Capitalize only when part of a full title: "Pack 214 Blue and Gold Banquet."

board
This may refer to an executive board and is written without capitalization in general reference. It may refer to a board of review only on second reference.

board of regents
Recipients of the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award are invited to join the Board of Regents of the National Eagle Scout Association. The chairman of the NESA Board of Regents is elected by those who have accepted membership. Capitalize only when reference is clearly to the NESA Board of Regents.

board of review
A review held to determine if a Boy Scout has satisfactorily completed rank requirements. A review may be held also to encourage Boy Scouts who are not advancing. For the first five ranks, the board of review is conducted by the troop committee. For the Eagle Scout rank, the council decides whether the unit committee or the district or council committee responsible for advancement conducts the board of review. At least one district or council advancement representative shall be a member of the unit board of review.

Boardsailing BSA
This award was developed to introduce Scouts to basic boardsailing skills, equipment, and safety precautions; to encourage the development of skills that promote fitness and safe aquatic recreation; and to lay a skill and knowledge foundation for those who will later participate in more advanced and demanding activities on the water.

boats
See "ships and spacecraft."

boatswain
(Pronounced BO sun.) The elected youth leader of a Sea Scout ship. The office is comparable to president of a Venturing crew.

boatswain's mate
The Sea Scouting equivalent of vice president in a Venturing crew. See "mate."

Bobcat
The first rank earned by every boy in Cub Scouting.

book titles
See "composition titles."

booth show
Booth displays by Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, and Venturers are put on simultaneously while the audience walks around to observe them. This indoor or outdoor event may include stage shows for individual unit demonstrations. See also "arena show."

boy-fact survey
A survey used to find who potential youth members are and where they live.

Boy Scout
A registered youth member of a Boy Scout troop or one registered as a Lone Boy Scout. On second reference or in informal usage, "Scout" is synonymous with "Boy Scout." The Boy Scout badge signifies fulfillment of the joining requirements; it does not represent a rank. See "Boy Scouting."

Boy Scout Division
The arm of the National Council Program Group that develops and administers Boy Scouting and Varsity Scouting. See "division."

Boy Scout Leader Wood Badge
See "Wood Badge."

Boy Scout Leader's Training Award
A training recognition for adults in Boy Scouting. See "Scoutmaster's Key."

Boy Scouting
That part of the program of the Boy Scouts of America for boys and young men not yet 18 years old, and who are at least 11, or have completed the fifth grade and are at least 10 years old, or who have earned the Arrow of Light Award in Cub Scouting and are at least 10 years old. Boy Scouts advance through Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, and Life ranks to Eagle Scout. The emphasis is on outdoor activity, learning skills, developing leadership ability, and service. The unit is a Boy Scout troop. See "Scouting program."

Boy Scouts of America
The legal name of the organization is singular. Example: "In 2010 the Boy Scouts of America will celebrate its 100th anniversary." The abbreviation is BSA (without periods) and is used with the article ("the BSA") when used as a noun. See "National Council" and "national office."

Boys' Life
The magazine for all boys published by the Boy Scouts of America. The title should be typeset in italics and underlined when typed. Note the placement of the apostrophe (not Boy's).

brand names
When they are used, capitalize them. "Brand name" is a nonlegal term for "service mark" or "trademark." Brand names normally should be used only if they are essential; otherwise, use generic terms. See "trademarks." The Web site of the International Trademark Association, www.inta.org, has a list of brand names and their accepted generic terms.

bridge of honor
An award presentation ceremony in Sea Scouting.

Bronze Award
Five Bronze awards are available to Venturers. Each Bronze Award relates to one of the five Venturing special-interest clusters: sports, arts and hobbies, youth ministries, outdoors, and Sea Scouting. Venturers may earn all five awards. Achievement of at least one Bronze Award is a requirement for the Gold Award.

Bronze Pelican
The Bronze Pelican is a religious award of the Roman Catholic Church bestowed upon adult leaders who have been judged worthy by the Catholic Committee on Scouting. 

Bronze Palm
See "Eagle Palms."

Bronze Wolf Award
The only award of the World Organization of the Scout Movement, this is presented by the World Scout Committee for outstanding service to Scouting.

Brotherhood membership
The second and final induction phase of membership in the Order of the Arrow. Capitalize Brotherhood only when referring to membership or to the ceremony. Do not capitalize when referring to friendship.

BSA Aquatics Instructor
A five-year training designation awarded to an adult who satisfactorily completes the Aquatics section at a BSA National Camping School.

BSA Bike Safe
A standard set of bicycling principles.

BSA Family Award
The BSA Family Award is earned by a Cub Scout and his family when they complete five of eight requirements that are outlined in the BSA Family Book.

BSA family camping
An outdoor camping experience, other than resident camping, that involves elements of Cub Scouting, Boy Scouting, or Venturing in overnight settings with two or more family members, including at least one BSA member of the family.

BSA Family program
The BSA Family program, as outlined in the BSA Family Book, helps strengthen families of Cub Scouts and encourages family involvement in Scouting. The program includes a weekly "family talk" that provides family members an opportunity to learn and practice relationship skills as well as suggested family activities that fulfill requirements for registered BSA families to earn the BSA Family Award.

BSA Intranet
A private and secure computer network designed to connect all local council and business units of the BSA using technology similar to that of the Internet.

BSA Lifeguard
A three-year training designation awarded to Boy Scouts, Venturers, and adults who meet prescribed requirements in aquatics skills, Safe Swim Defense, Safety Afloat, first aid, and emergency action. See "BSA Aquatics Instructor."

BSA Lifeguard Counselor
The certification for adults who train BSA Aquatics Instructors.

BSA local council
Not "BSA council" or "local BSA council."

BSA Mission Statement
The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

BSA Vision Statement
The Boy Scouts of America is the nation's foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training.

In the future Scouting will continue to:

  • Offer young people responsible fun and adventure
  • Instill in young people lifetime values and develop in them ethical character as expressed in the Scout Oath and Law
  • Train young people in citizenship, service, and leadership
  • Serve America's communities and families with its quality values-based program

buddy system
One part of the Safe Swim Defense plan. Swimmers of like ability are paired, check in and out of the water together, and stay within 10 feet of each other during the swim. The buddy system is also used in other aquatics, hiking, and camping activities for safety reasons and in working with a merit badge counselor.

budget plan
A method used by a unit to develop thrift habits. A yearly budget is established and weekly dues are agreed upon.

bugler
An appointed youth position in a Sea Scout ship or a Boy Scout troop.

Bylaws of the Boy Scouts of America
The document that defines all legal aspects of the operation of the Boy Scouts of America corporation. Contained in the Charter and Bylaws of the Boy Scouts of America.

caliber
The form: ".22-caliber rifle." Also see "firearms."

calling-out ceremony
The ceremony that begins the membership induction process for a newly elected Order of the Arrow candidate. Can use "callout" on subsequent references.  See also "Tap-out ceremonny"

camp director
The Scouter in charge of the administration of a Boy Scout resident camp or a Cub Scout day camp or resident camp.

camp ranger
A ranger's responsibilities may include keeping camp facilities functioning properly, performing camp improvements and maintenance, issuing supplies and equipment related to maintenance, directing the maintenance staff, and managing the off-season program. Usually the ranger reports to the camp director or business manager.

Campaign for Local Council Endowment
See "Nationally Coordinated Campaign for Local Council Endowment."

campcraft
See "outdoor skills."

camping
Camping is the hallmark of Scouting. See "day camp," "long-term camping," "outdoor program," "high adventure," "High Adventure Division," and "resident camping."

camping director
A professional Scouter who is responsible for development of the year-round camping program of the local council. This person supervises the long-term camping program and may or may not serve as the resident camp director.

campmaster
A volunteer Scouter trained to assist in short-term camping. Many councils organize a campmaster corps as a resource for their units. Also see "wagonmaster."

camporall
A weekend council activity in which all districts of a council participate in a coordinated camporee-type program. Capitalize only when referring to a specific council's camporall: "Circle Ten Council Camporall."

camporama
An activity that combines the essential elements of a camporee or camporall and a booth Scouting show. Capitalize only when referring to a specific council's camporama: "National Capital Area Council Camporama."

camporee
Derived from two words: camp and jamboree. A camporee is a district or council troop activity that demonstrates the techniques of living in camp. Involves a one- or two-night camping experience and may include outdoor skills competition. Capitalize only when referring to a specific district's or troop's event: "Hiawatha District Camporee."

campout
A camping activity with at least one overnight stay. One word.

campsite
A unit's outdoor home for an overnight, resident, or long-term camp or for den activities at Cub Scout day camp. One word.

Campways
A nationwide system of stopover camps for traveling Boy Scout troops, Varsity Scout teams, and Venturing crews using official BSA tour permits.

capitalization
In general, avoid unnecessary capitalization. When in doubt, don't capitalize.

Many words and phrases, including special cases, are listed separately in this guide. Entries that are capitalized without further comment should be capitalized in all uses. If there is no relevant listing in this guide for a particular word or phrase, consult the latest edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary. Use lowercase if the dictionary lists it as an acceptable form for the sense in which the word is being used.

As used in this book, "capitalize" means to use uppercase for the first letter of a word. If additional capital letters are needed, they are called for by an example or a phrase such as "use all caps."

Following are some Scouting specifics:

  • Activities. Do not capitalize "pow wow," "camporee," "lunchoree," "jamboree," or "show" unless the reference is to a specific event: Midland District Pow Wow, South Central Camporee, the 1997 National Scout Jamboree, Pioneer Day Scouting Show.
  • Groups. Do not capitalize "pack," "den," "troop," "patrol," "team," "ship," "crew," "district," "council," "region," or "area" unless the reference is specific: Pack 10, Den 5, Troop 6, Fox Patrol, Ship 2, Central District, Circle Ten Council, Western Region, Area 2.
  • Headings and Titles of Works. In headings and titles that use uppercase and lowercase letters, capitalize the first letter of the first word, the first letter of the last word, and all other words except "to" in infinitives [Dare to Fly With the Eagles], articles [a, an, the], coordinating conjunctions [and, but, or, nor, for], and prepositions of fewer than four letters [at, by, for, in, of, off, on, per, to, up, via]. Do capitalize prepositions of four letters or more [With, From, Between, After]. Note that subordinating conjunctions [as, if, when] are capitalized [Scouts to Work at Cleanup As Their Good Turn].
  • Titles of Office or Group Members. Always capitalize Tiger Cub, Wolf Cub Scout, Bear Cub Scout, Webelos Scout, Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, Venturer, Cubmaster, Scoutmaster, Coach (Varsity Scout Coach only), Advisor (Venturing Advisor only), Skipper, Scouter, Chief Scout Executive, and Chief Scout of the World. Capitalize other titles only when they precede the name: District Executive Thorpe is working with other district executives; she is the council's Scout executive.
  • Capitalize the names of nationalities, religious organizations, and tribal or racial groups; do not capitalize group names that refer to color: American, Islamic, Hispanic, African American, Asian, American Indian, black, white.

Also see "composition titles."

captain
The elected youth leader of a Varsity Scout team.

cathole
One word.

Centigrade
Use this term rather than "celsius" for the temperature scale that is part of the metric system. To convert to Fahrenheit, multiply a Centigrade temperature by 9, divide by 5, and add 32 (25(9=225, 225(5=45, 45+32=77 degrees Fahrenheit). Generally, the Fahrenheit temperature scale is presumed if Centigrade is not specified. Also see "Fahrenheit" and "temperatures."

Centennial Quality awards
Quality awards available from 2007 to 2010 in celebration of the BSA centennial. See "Quality awards."

Center for Professional Development
Professional Development Levels 1, 2, and 3 (abbreviated PD-L1, PD-L2, and PD-L3) and other courses for professional Scouters and professional-technical employees are taught at this center, which is located near the national office. Historical references may refer to National Training School (NTS) or National Executive Institute (NEI) courses, but these terms are obsolete.

cents
Spell out the word "cents" and lowercase, using numerals for amounts less than a dollar: "5 cents," "12 cents." Use the "$" sign and decimal system for larger amounts: "$1.01," "$2.50." Numerals alone, with or without a decimal point as appropriate, may be used in tabular matter.

century
Lowercase, spelling out numbers less than 10: "the first century," "the 21st century," "a 19th-century novel."

certificate of merit
See "Local Council Certificate of Merit" and "National Certificate of Merit."

chairman, chairwoman
Generally, do not capitalize unless used as a formal title before a name: "company Chairman Rocky Rhodes"; "the chairwoman called the meeting to order"; "committee chairman Robert Jones" (informal use of a temporary position: lowercase). Do not use "chairperson" unless it is an organization's formal title for an office. However, if possible, do not presume maleness with the use of "chairman." Some alternatives: chair, moderator, committee head, coordinator, speaker.

chaplain
(1) A spiritual leader for units appointed by the church, synagogue, or community organization chartered to use the Scouting program. (2) One who gives spiritual leadership to a camp or jamboree community; conducts religious services according to his or her faith and arranges for other religious observance as needed; provides help in dealing with morale; and visits those who are ill and provides counseling in case of bereavement.

chaplain aide
A youth leader who works with the troop chaplain to ensure all members have appropriate religious observance during outings and helps other Scouts in the religious emblems program. Appointed by the senior patrol leader with the Scoutmaster's advice and consent.

chapter
An optional geographic administrative unit of an Order of the Arrow lodge corresponding to a district or multiple districts.

Character Connections®
This method of emphasizing character development through the 12 Core Values is woven throughout the Cub Scouting program and is not a separate "program." It challenges Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts to consider (1) knowledge (What do I know or think about the Core Value, the experience, etc.); (2) commitment (How do I feel about this value?); and (3) practice (What can I do to demonstrate this value at school, at home, with my friends?). See "12 Core Values."

Charles L. Sommers High Adventure Base
This year-round headquarters facility in Ely, Minnesota, offers cold-weather camping and access to dozens of wilderness routes in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in Minnesota and the Quetico Provincial Park in Ontario, Canada. See "Northern Tier National High Adventure Program."

charter
In the BSA, charters authorize (1) an organization to operate BSA Scouting units (see "chartered organization"); (2) a local council to incorporate as a BSA local council; (3) operation of an Order of the Arrow lodge; or (4) the Boy Scouts of America to incorporate. See "Charter of the Boy Scouts of America" and "Charter and Bylaws of the Boy Scouts of America." When used as a verb, use "to obtain a charter" and "to renew a charter" rather than "to charter" or "to recharter."

Charter and Bylaws of the Boy Scouts of America
The published booklet containing the two documents. Underlined when typed and italic when typeset if reference is to the physical book; titles of the separate documents are not underlined or italicized.

Charter of the Boy Scouts of America
This Congressional Act of Incorporation, passed on June 15, 1916, authorized and set standards for the incorporation of the Boy Scouts of America. It also protects the name, emblems, badges, and descriptive or designating marks, words, or phrases of the program. See "Charter and Bylaws of the Boy Scouts of America."

charter presentation
A formal ceremony at which the charter, Scouter commissions, and membership certificates are presented to organization authorities and members of the unit.

charter renewal
An annual meeting attended by the chartered organization representative, head of the chartered organization, troop leaders, and unit commissioner for the purpose of completing the charter application and making plans for the charter presentation.

charter review
See "membership inventory."

chartered organization
A religious, civic, fraternal, educational, or other community-based organization that has applied for and received a charter to operate a BSA Scouting unit. Do not use the term "chartered partner" or the term "sponsoring unit."

chartered organization representative
A manager of Scouting in a chartered organization who also represents this organization in the local council and district. Formerly called "Scouting Coordinator" and "Institutional Representative"

chartered partner
Do not use this term in place of "chartered organization."

cheermaster
This Scout is in charge of leading patrol songs, yells, stunts, and campfire programs. He is appointed by the patrol leader.

chief
The key elected youth leader in the Order of the Arrow who may be a chapter chief, lodge chief, section chief, regional chief, or national chief.

Chief Scout
The United Kingdom's version of Chief Scout Executive.

Chief Scout Citizen
Theodore Roosevelt was named Chief Scout Citizen in 1910 when the Boy Scouts of America was founded. Always capitalize.

Chief Scout Executive
The top-ranking professional Scouter of the Boy Scouts of America. This is the only professional title that is routinely capitalized.

Chief Scout Executive's Winners' Circle
Scouting professionals with a direct or supporting membership responsibility must have a gain in membership in their service area on June 30 over the same period one year before and a gain in total units to be in the Winners' Circle.

Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
The parentheses and the words they surround are part of the formal name.

Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) National Association of Scouters
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and the Boy Scouts of America.

church
Capitalize as part of the formal name of building, congregation, or denomination; lowercase in other uses: "St. Mary's Church," "the Roman Catholic Church," "a Presbyterian church." Do not use as a catch-all phrase in reference to places of worship.

Church of Christ, Scientist
The international headquarters is at the Mother Church in Boston. A branch church, governed by its own board, is named the First Church of Christ, Scientist, or Second Church, etc., according to the order of its establishment in a community. The terms "Christian Science Church" or "Churches of Christ, Scientist," are acceptable in all references to the denomination.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Note the punctuation and capitalization of "Latter-day." Other preferred forms include "The Church of Jesus Christ" or "The Church." Any other form of the church name is discouraged. Shortened references to members include "Latter-day Saints" and "Mormons."

Church of the New Jerusalem (The New Church)
Members of this faith share a common belief in the Bible and the teachings of the 18th-century scientist and theologian Emanuel Swedenborg (so they are sometimes known as "Swedenborgians").

Churches of Christ
Individual churches function autonomously and do not regard themselves as a denomination.

Climb On Safely
The BSA's recommended procedure for conducting unit climbing/rappelling activities. The eight points—qualified supervision, discipline, physical fitness, safe area, equipment, planning, environmental conditions, and qualified instruction—help ensure the safety and well-being of participants. Note the uppercase "On."

cluster
A grouping of Venturing crews by program interest. The five national Venturing clusters are arts and hobbies, outdoors, sports, youth ministries, and Sea Scouting.

Coach
The commissioned volunteer Scouter, 21 or older, appointed to lead a Varsity Scout team.

Coach's Corner
A short inspirational message given by the Coach during a Varsity Scout team meeting.

cocaptain
An assistant youth leader of a Varsity Scout team.

coed Venturing crews
The membership policy of a Venturing crew is determined by the organization chartering the crew. The organization may determine whether its crew is to be coed, all male, or all female. (The majority of crews are coed.) It is recommended that coed crews have male and female adult leaders.

College Scouter Reserve
A registration status for young people 18 and older who are in college, have been actively registered in Scouting, and commit themselves to an informed interest and active participation in the program whenever possible.

colon
See "punctuation."

comma
See "punctuation."

commissioned personnel
The commissioned personnel of a council includes all professional Scouters and all commissioners.

commissioner
A commissioned Scouter who works with packs, troops, teams, and Venturing crews to help the units succeed. In addition to the council commissioner, there are district commissioners, assistant district commissioners, roundtable commissioners, huddle commissioners, and unit commissioners. Also see "international commissioner."

committee
(1) The work of the National Council is conducted by volunteers working in committees with the guidance of professional Scouters. There are five group standing committees of the National Executive Board: the Administration Group Committee, Program Group Committee, Human Resources Group Committee, Regional Presidents' Group Committee, and Relationships/Marketing Group Committee. Under these are 14 support standing committees: the Supply Committee, Finance and Investment Committee, Properties Committee, Marketing Committee, Relationships Committee, Cub Scout Committee, Boy Scout Committee, Venturing Committee, Finance Support Committee, High Adventure Committee, Council Services Committee, Professional Development Committee, Compensation and Benefits Committee, and Human Resources Administration Committee. (2) A council may have committees to direct any of the various aspects of the program as it deems necessary. (3) The district committee is a group of volunteer adults responsible for carrying out the council program within their district. (4) A local chartered organization has a unit committee, composed of volunteers, to administer the affairs of each unit it operates. (5) Some national organizations have advisory committees to guide the use of Scouting by their affiliated local community and religious organizations and to promote cooperation between them and the Boy Scouts of America. Capitalize "committee" only in the official name of a particular committee. Combinations: "national Boy Scout Committee," "Longhorn Council Finance Committee," "district membership committees," "troop committee," "National Catholic Committee on Scouting."

Committee for Meher Baba of Scouting
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the Meher Baba faith and the Boy Scouts of America.

Community of Christ
Formerly the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Changed its name in 2001.

compass points emblem
Awarded to Webelos Scouts when they have earned four activity badges in addition to those needed for the Webelos badge. A metal compass point may be pinned to the emblem for each four activity badges earned subsequently until three compass points have been earned.

composition titles
Capitalize the principal words, including prepositions of four or more letters. The word "to" in infinitives is not capitalized. See also "capitalization." Italicize the following:

  • Titles of books and booklets: The Boy Scout Handbook; Cub Scout Program Helps
  • Periodicals: Boys' Life magazine; ProSpeak
  • Newspapers: Dallas Morning News
  • Sections of newspapers published separately: New York Times Book Review
  • Plays: Romeo and Juliet
  • Movies: Gone With the Wind
  • Long poems published separately: Milton's Paradise Lost
  • Operas and other long musical compositions
  • Works of art: Grant Wood's American Gothic

Enclose the following titles in quotation marks:

  • Articles and features in periodicals and newspapers
  • Chapter titles in books
  • Short stories and essays
  • Short poems
  • TV and radio shows
  • Songs and short musical compositions
  • Computer games: "Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?"

Do not use quotation marks or italics for posters, calendars, short fliers, cards, and the like.

conclave
A section training meeting for Order of the Arrow members from a specific geographic area.

congress
Capitalize "U.S. Congress" and "Congress" when referring to the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.

congressional
Lowercase unless part of a proper name: "congressional salaries," "the Congressional Quarterly," "the Congressional Record."

Congressional Award
A recognition given by the Congress of the United States to young people ages 14 through 23 who accomplish high goals in voluntary public service.

conservation Good Turn
An opportunity for Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Varsity Scout teams, and Venturing crews to join with conservation or environmental organizations (federal, state, local, or private) to carry out a conservation Good Turn in their communities. A new conservation Good Turn emphasis was launched in January 1995 and is ongoing.

constitution
Capitalize references to the U.S. Constitution, with or without the "U.S." modifier: "The president said he supports the Constitution." Lowercase in other uses: "the organization's constitution." Lowercase "constitutional" in all uses.

consultant
A person who has special skills, equipment, facilities, or contacts in an interest area related to the interests of Venturing crew members or of a Varsity Scout team activity.

contingent
May be used to describe an official Scout group at an official Scout event. Otherwise, use "delegation." The term "delegation" also is used when referring to the group of Scouts who attend the annual Report to the Nation.

contractions
Don't be afraid to use them, but don't overdo it. Contractions reflect informal speech and writing. Contractions are acceptable in informal contexts where they reflect the way a phrase commonly appears in speech or writing and when they won't cause confusion.

cookout
No hyphen.

COPE
See "Project COPE."

Core Values
See "12 Core Values."

council
An administrative body chartered to be responsible for Scouting in a designated geographic territory. See "BSA local council," "local council," and "National Council." Capitalize only when referring to a specific local council or the National Council: "St. Louis Area Council," "Greater St. Louis Area Council."

council employee
A full-time or part-time employee serving in a support position not classified under professional, professional-technical, or paraprofessional guidelines (i.e., secretaries, clerks, custodial personnel, most camp rangers, and seasonal camp employees). It is recommended that all council employees be registered members of the BSA.

council junior leader training conference
This term is now obsolete. See "National Youth Leadership Training."

council office
See "council service center."

Council Packet
A collection of pertinent, detailed information for councils and key national staff members. Distributed regularly from the national office.

council president
The elected volunteer Scouter who heads the council and chairs its executive board.

council service center
The business center for the local administration of Scouting. "Council office" may be used, but "council service center" is preferred as being more representative of its function.

court of honor
A recognition ceremony for those who have met the requirements of any one of the Boy Scout ranks, merit badges, or other awards. See "National Court of Honor."

crew
(1) A working group of Sea Scouts in a ship. There are usually several crews in a ship. This compares with the Cub Scout den, the Boy Scout patrol, and the Varsity Scout team. (2) A working group of five to 12 members of a high-adventure base contingent. (3) See "Venturing crew."

crew code and bylaws
A set of bylaws adopted by the members of a Venturing crew or Sea Scout ship to guide their officers and program. The Venturing Code is included as a preamble.

crew leader
The elected youth leader of a Sea Scout or high-adventure base crew.

critical issues
The strategic planning process of the BSA identifies critical issues that need special attention from everybody in the Scouting movement. The five critical issues of 2006-2010 are:

  • Every eligible youth has an opportunity to be involved in a quality Scouting experience.
  • The number of engaged, accountable volunteers is dramatically increased at all levels of Scouting.
  • Evey local council is fiscally sound.
  • Local, regional, and national chartered organizations and strategic alliances are identified and engaged.
  • Enough of the right professionals are identified, developed, and retained in the right positions at all levels, with a focus on diversity.

crossover
When Webelos Scouts become Boy Scouts: "Webelos crossover."

Cub Scout
A registered youth member of a Cub Scout pack or one registered as a Lone Cub Scout who has completed first grade but who has not yet completed third grade, or who is age 8 or 9. See "Cub Scouting."

Cub Scout Academics and Sports program
A supplemental enrichment program that complements Cub Scouting. A pack may select any of 38 sports or academic subjects to pursue. Sports or Academics belt loops, pins, and jacket letters recognize the Cub Scouts for participation and practice.

Cub Scout day camp
See "day camp."

Cub Scout Division
The arm of the National Council Program Group that develops and administers Cub Scouting.

Cub Scout handshake
Used by Cub Scouts and Cub Scouters; like an ordinary handshake with the right hand except that the index and middle fingers are extended toward the other person, touching his wrist.

Cub Scout Leader Basic Training
Designed to provide Cub Scout and Webelos Scout leaders with basic information about their responsibilities.

Cub Scout Leave No Trace Pledge
I promise to practice the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines wherever I go: 1) Plan ahead. 2) Stick to trails. 3) Manage your pet. 4) Leave what you find. 5) Respect other visitors. 6) Trash your trash.

Cub Scout motto
Do Your Best.

Cub Scout Promise
I, [name], promise to do my best
To do my duty to God and my country,
To help other people,
and To obey the Law of the Pack.

Cub Scout Renewal Plan
A computer-based, personalized approach to reclaiming separated Cub Scouts to the program.

Cub Scout resident camp
See "resident camping."

Cub Scout salute
A hand salute made by Cub Scouts and Cub Scouters with the fingers of the right hand held in position as for the Cub Scout sign, except that the index and middle fingers are held together. The tips of the fingers touch the right eyebrow or the bill of the Cub Scout cap.

Cub Scout sign
A sign made by raising the right hand straight up high over the head with the palm forward. The first two fingers are wide apart and pointing up as in a V. The thumb covers the nails of the ring and little fingers. Used when repeating the Cub Scout Promise or Law of the Pack and as a signal for quiet in meetings.

Cub Scouter
A registered member of a Cub Scout pack, 18 or older, or a professional Scouter who works with Cub Scouting. (Do not use "Cubber" to correspond to "Scouter" because "Cub" is not a verb.)

Cub Scouter Award
An award for Cub Scouters for completing requirements of tenure, training, and performance. See "Cubmaster Award."

Cub Scouting
That part of the program of the Boy Scouts of America for boys who are in the first grade through fifth grade (or are 7 through 10 years old). Tiger Cubs are in the first grade (or age 7); Cub Scouts, second or third grade (or ages 8 or 9); and Webelos Scouts, fourth and fifth grade (or age 10). The unit is a Cub Scout pack and the pack is made up of dens of the various age groups. The emphasis is on family-centered activities, group activities, learning, and having fun. (Never use the term "Cubbing"; "Cub" is not a verb.) See "Tiger Cubs BSA."

Cub Scouting's Leave No Trace Awareness Award
Cub Scout youth and adult members can earn this award by taking the Cub Scout Leave No Trace Pledge and fulfilling six age-appropriate requirements.

Cubbing, Cubber
Do not use to correspond to "Scouting" and "Scouter" because "Cub" is not a verb. However, "Cubbing" may be appropriate in historical contexts, as the term was used before 1945.

Cubmaster
A volunteer Scouter, 21 or older, appointed by the chartered organization to lead a Cub Scout pack.

Cubmaster Award
An award available to Cubmasters for completing requirements of tenure, training, and performance.

Cubmaster's Minute
See "Den Leader's Minute."

dates
Always use figures, without "st," "nd," "rd," or "th": "The committee will meet on Monday, December 3."

day camp
An organized, multiple-day, theme-oriented program for Tiger Cubs and their adult partners, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts that is conducted by the council/district under trained leadership at an approved site during daylight or early evening hours.

decades
Use Arabic figures to indicate decades of history. Use an apostrophe to indicate numerals that are left out; show plural by adding the letter s only: "the 1970s" "the '60s," "the mid-1980s."

Declaration of Independence
Lowercase "the declaration" whenever it stands alone.

deferred gift
See "planned giving."

den
A neighborhood group of four to eight Cub Scouts or Webelos Scouts that meets periodically, usually once a week, and is part of a Cub Scout pack.

den chief
A Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or Venturer who helps direct the activities of a Cub Scout den. Appointed by the senior patrol leader with the Scoutmaster's advice and consent. Also see "Webelos den chief."

Den Chief Service Award
A den chief must fulfill training and service requirements while serving a den for a full year or more to earn this recognition.

Den Chief Training
A one-day training experience conducted by the pack, district, or council to equip den chiefs with the knowledge, skills, and enthusiasm to perform their responsibilities.

den leader
A volunteer leader, 21 or older, appointed by the pack committee to plan and direct the den's activities.  Also called a Den Mother.

Den Leader Award
An award available to Cub Scout den leaders for completing requirements of tenure, training, and performance. There is also a Webelos Den Leader Award.

Den Leader's Minute
An important, inspirational thought for the day or a brief story that reflects on the Cub Scout Promise, the Law of the Pack, the Cub Scout motto, or a patriotic item—told without moralizing. Told as part of the closing at the end of a meeting. A Cubmaster may also close with a Cubmaster's Minute.

denner
A Cub Scout or Webelos Scout elected by his peers to help the den chief and den leader.

density
Of the total available youth, the percentage who are members. Example: "West District has a Cub Scout density of 45.6 percent."

different
Takes the preposition "from," not "than."

dimensions
Use figures and spell out the unit (such as "inches," "feet," "yards") to indicate depth, height, length, and width. Hyphenate adjectival forms before nouns. Examples: "He is 4 feet, 6 inches tall"; "he is a 4-foot-6-inch boy"; "it rained 5 inches in one hour"; "a 3-by-5-inch card"; "the card was 3 by 5 inches"; "the 600-yard run/walk."

Direct Service
Formerly called "Direct Service Council," this is the national office center through which U.S. citizens in other parts of the world can retain membership and affiliation with the Boy Scouts of America.

Direct Service units
These Boy Scouts of America units operate in other countries for military families and other Americans working abroad. The Transatlantic Council, Far East Council, and Direct Service Council operate as local councils for these units, provide communication between units, and provide communication with the BSA and with Scouting organizations in their countries of operation.

directions and regions
In general, lowercase "north," "south," "northeast," "northern," etc., when they indicate compass direction; capitalize these words when they designate regions of the United States. Some examples: "The cold front is moving east"; "he lived in the East for six years"; "A storm system that developed in the Midwest is spreading eastward. It will bring showers to the East Coast by morning. High temperatures will prevail throughout western states."

  • With names of nations: Lowercase unless they are part of a proper name or are used to designate a politically divided nation: "northern France," "eastern Canada." But: "Northern Ireland," "South Korea."
  • With states and cities: The preferred form is to lowercase compass points when they describe only a section of a state or city: "western Texas," "southern Atlanta." When used in denoting widely known sections: "Southern California," "the South Side of Chicago," "the Lower East Side of New York."

disabilities
Follow these guidelines when referring to people with physical disabilities:

  • Disabled. A general term used for a physical or cognitive condition that substantially limits one or more of the major daily life activities. Avoid the use of "the disabled" to describe disabled people as a group.
  • Handicapped. Avoid this term in describing a disability or a person who is disabled.
  • Blind. Describes a person with complete loss of sight. For others, use terms such as "visually impaired" or "person with low vision."
  • Deaf. Describes a person with total hearing loss. For others, use "partial hearing loss," "hearing impaired," or "partially deaf." Avoid the term "deaf mute"; do not use "deaf and dumb."
  • Wheelchair-user. A person who uses a wheelchair for independent mobility. Do not use "confined to a wheelchair" or "wheelchair-bound."

distances
Use figures for 10 and above; spell out one through nine: "He walked five miles"; "he lived 25 miles away."

distinguished citizen award dinner
A testimonial fund-raising dinner honoring a key community leader.

Distinguished Commissioner Service Award
A plaque, bolo tie, and embroidered square knot are the recognitions for active commissioners who fulfill requirements that include length of service, percentage of units that renew charters, and Quality Unit Award percentage.

Distinguished Eagle Scout Award
A recognition bestowed upon a man who received the Eagle Scout Award 25 or more years ago and has made a significant contribution to his community.

Distinguished Service Award
Presented to those Order of the Arrow members who have rendered outstanding service to the OA on a sectional, area, regional, or national basis.

distinguished service awards
These awards, presented by the National Court of Honor, are the Silver Buffalo, Silver Antelope, Silver Beaver, Silver World, and Distinguished Eagle Scout Award.

distributor
See "Scouting distributor."

district
A geographical area of the council determined by the council executive board to help ensure the growth and success of Scouting units within the district's territory. Capitalize only when naming a specific district: "Arrowhead District," "District 2," "districtwide."

district committee
Consisting of chartered organization representatives and elected district members at large, the district committee coordinates the functions of the district to carry out the policies and objectives of the council. The executive officer of the district committee is the district chairperson.

district executive
A professional Scouter who works under the direction of the local council Scout executive and acts as an adviser to the volunteer leaders in the district.

division
An administrative branch of a National Council group; comprises services. Combinations: "Boy Scout Division," "Information Systems Division."

Do a Good Turn Daily
This is the Scout slogan.

Do Your Best
This is the Cub Scout motto.

dollars
Always lowercase. Use figures and the "$" sign in all except casual references or amounts without a figure. "The book cost $4"; "Dad, please give me a dollar"; "Dollars are flowing overseas." For specified amounts, the word takes a singular verb: "He said $500,000 is what they want." For amounts of more than $1 million, use the "$" and numerals up to two decimal places. Do not link the numerals and the word by a hyphen: "It is worth $4.35 million"; "It is worth exactly $4,351,242"; "He proposed a $300 billion budget." The form for amounts less than $1 million: "$4," "$25," "$500," "$1,000," "$650,000." Also see "cents."

Donald Rogert Canoeing High Adventure Base
This base in Atikokan, Ontario, Canada, offers trips north and northeast in the White Otter area and south into the Quetico Provincial Park. See "Northern Tier National High Adventure Program."

Donor Awareness Presidential Good Turn
To increase understanding of organ donation and how it can benefit the lives of others, the BSA distributes literature on organ donation and sends a Donor Awareness patch to families that discuss organ donation.

Double H High Adventure Base
The newest high-adventure program, Double H offers a wilderness experience in central New Mexico for older Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, and Venturers. See "High Adventure Division."

Drugs: A Deadly Game
The BSA's campaign to encourage youth to repudiate drugs.

E-Learning Course Management System
Available through MyScouting at
www.scouting.org, this provides a selection of courses for adult volunteers that may be taken for credit.

e-mail
Short form of "electronic mail." Do not capitalize the "E" unless it starts a sentence.

E. Urner Goodman Camping Award
Awarded annually by the national Order of the Arrow committee to two Order of the Arrow lodges in each region for excellence in camp promotion and attendance.

E. Urner Goodman Scholarship Fund program
A scholarship program for Arrowmen considering a career in the professional service of the Boy Scouts of America.

Eagle Palms
Each Palm worn on the Eagle Scout Rank ribbon represents being active in the troop and patrol for at least three months after becoming an Eagle Scout or earning the last Palm, showing Scout spirit, making a satisfactory effort to develop and demonstrate leadership ability, earning five additional merit badges, and taking part in a Scoutmaster conference. The Bronze Palm represents the first five merit badges after Eagle Scout, the Gold Palm the next five, and the Silver Palm the third five. (Thereafter, combine them; e.g., one Bronze Palm and one Silver Palm for 20 merit badges after Eagle Scout.) Combinations: "Eagle Palm," "Palm," "Palms."

Eagle Scout
The highest rank for Scouts. Combinations: "Eagle Scout badge," "Eagle Scout requirements," "Eagle Scout rank." never Eagle Scout Award.

Eagle Scout Association
Founded in St. Louis, MO in 1947 by men who rememebred their Eagle Scout charge.  It is the oldest organization of it's kind.  The ESA's membership consists of Eagle Scouts of all ages who want to give back to Scouting some of what they got out of Scouting. www.ESAstl.org

Eagle Scout Recognition Dinner (or Day)
An annual event in which the Eagle Scout Association and the council  recognize Scouts who have earned the Eagle Scout Rank during the previous year.

Eagle service project
While a Life Scout, a boy plans, develops, and gives leadership to others in a project that benefits any religious organization, school, or community.

Eagletter
A periodical published for members of the Eagle Scout Association.

earth
Capitalize only in reference to the planet. The ground outside is lowercase "earth."   Earth Day is 22 April each year.

Eastern Orthodox churches
The term applies to a group of churches that do not recognize papal authority over their activities.

Eastern Orthodox Committee on Scouting
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the Eastern Orthodox churches and the Boy Scouts of America.

Eastern-Rite Catholic churches
Note the use of the hyphen, which is preferred in Scouting uses. The term applies to a group of Catholic churches organized along ethnic lines traceable to churches established during the early days of Christianity.

elected officers' seminar
An annual planning and training program conducted by the Advisor for newly elected Venturing crew youth officers.

elective
A part of Cub Scout advancement. There are 24 electives in the Bear Cub Scout Book and 22 in the Wolf Cub Scout Book. For every 10 elective projects completed, a Cub Scout is awarded one Arrow Point. Capitalize only when writing about a specific elective: "Wolf Elective 4," "a Bear elective."

em dash
The longer em dash, often called just a "dash," is used in the following instances:

  • To denote a sudden break in thought or change in sentence structure: "Bathe regularly—once a day if you can—for good health."
  • To give emphasis or added explanation: "Do not break the blisters—this will compound the injury by causing an open wound." (A semicolon would also be correct here, but the dash helps add emphasis to the message.); "That's the bearing of the landmark—the number of degrees it is from magnetic north."
  • Series within a sentence: "He listed the qualities—honesty, trustworthiness, and kindness—that he felt were most important."

A dash is often denoted by two hyphens in typewriting (--); however, the use of the em dash is more professional looking in word-processed documents.

emblem
Do not capitalize: jamboree emblem, compass points emblem, Trained Leader emblem, and all of the religious emblems (God and Me emblem, Alpha Omega emblem).  Sometimes called "patch".

en dash
Uses of the en dash:

  • To connect inclusive numbers (such as dates, page numbers, time): 1968–72, pages 113–14, 6–8 P.M.; fiscal year 1998–99. However, do not combine the en dash with words in "from/to" and "between/and" constructions: "from 1968 to 1972" (never "from 1968–72"); between 6 and 8 P.M. (never between 6–8 P.M.).
  • In a compound adjective when one of the elements is an open compound: post-Civil War period ("Civil War" is an open compound); New York-London flight ("New York" is an open compound).

firearms
Gun is also an acceptable term for any firearm. Note the following definitions:

  • caliber. A measurement of the diameter of the inside of a gun barrel except for most shotguns. Measurement is in either millimeters or decimal fractions of an inch. The word "caliber" is not used when giving the metric measurement. The forms: "a 9 mm pistol," "a .22-caliber rifle."
  • gauge. This word describes the size of a shotgun. Gauge is expressed in terms of the number per pound of round lead balls with a diameter equal to the size of the barrel. The larger the number, the smaller the shotgun. Some common gauges are 10, 12, 16, 20, and 28. The .410 is actually a caliber, but is called a gauge.
  • muzzleloader. One word, no hyphen. A firearm in which the propellant and projectile are inserted down the barrel instead of through a breech mechanism. The forms: "firing a muzzleloader," "a muzzleloading shotgun," "a muzzleloading pistol."
  • pistol. Any handgun that does not hold its ammunition in a revolving cylinder. It may be "a single shot," "a semiautomatic," or "an automatic." Its measurement is in calibers or millimeters. The forms: "a .45-caliber pistol," "a 9 mm pistol."
  • revolver. A handgun. Its cartridges are held in chambers in a cylinder that revolves. The form: "a .38-caliber revolver."
  • rifle. A firearm designed or made to be fired from the shoulder and having a rifled bore. It uses bullets or cartridges for ammunition. Its size is measured in calibers. The form: "a .22-caliber rifle."
  • shell. The word applies to military ammunition and to shotgun ammunition.
  • shot. Small lead or steel pellets fired by shotguns. A shotgun shell usually contains 1 to 2 ounces of shot. Do not use "shot" interchangeably with "buckshot," which refers only to the largest shot sizes.
  • shotgun. A small-arms gun with a smooth bore, sometimes double-barreled. Its ammunition is shot. Its size is measured in gauges. The form: "a 12-gauge shotgun."

hyphen. Generally, refer to the latest edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary to determine whether a hyphen is needed. Some uses of the hyphen:

  • In phone numbers: 972.580.2000. (The hyphen with the area code may be used, while preferred to the use of parentheses, however the period is most commonly accepted.)
  • When a compound modifier—two or more words that express a single concept—precedes a noun, use hyphens to link the words in the compound except the adverb "very" and all adverbs that end in "-ly": "a full-time job," "a well-known person," "a know-it-all attitude," "a very good time," "an easily remembered rule."
  • When a modifier that would be hyphenated before a noun occurs after a form of the verb "to be" (when it is a predicate adjective), retain the hyphen: "the person is well-known," "the job is full-time," "the child is quick-witted."
  • Use a hyphen to avoid confusing duplicated vowels and tripled consonants: "anti-intellectual," "pre-empt," "shell-like."

period.

  • Initials: "the poet T. S. Eliot" (Note the space between the initials in this case.) Abbreviations using only the initials of a name do not take periods: JFK, LBJ.
  • Always place periods inside quotation marks.
  • In phone numbers: 972.580.2000. (The period with the area code is preferred to the use of parentheses or hyphens.)

semicolon.

  • For clarity, use semicolons to separate elements of a series when the individual elements already contain commas: "He leaves his son, John Smith of Chicago; two daughters, Jan Smith and Mary Smith of Denver; and a sister, Martha, wife of Robert Owen, Omaha, Nebraska."
  • Use a semicolon to link two independent clauses that are not joined by and or but (in effect, two sentences): "The package was due last week; it arrived today." (But use a comma if the conjunction is included: "The package was due last week, but it arrived today.")
  • Place semicolons outside of quotation marks.

endowment fund
Assets owned and invested by a council from which generally only the income can be expended for current operations. Endowments can be restricted for particular purposes.

Episcopal Church, The
Acceptable in all references for the U.S. national church that is a member of the Anglican Communion (the worldwide association of Anglican churches).

Ernest F. Schmidt Scholarship Grant
The American Camping Association recognizes professional Scouters active in camping with this scholarship, which covers the fees and expenses for participation in its annual conference.

Eskimo, Eskimos
This term is acceptable when making general references to native peoples of northern North America. However, Aleuts and Inuits should be called such when possible.

ethnic heritage
Do not use a hyphen for terms describing dual ethnic heritage: African American, Asian American, Hispanic American.

European Camp Staff program
Registered members of the BSA may apply to serve as staff members at a Scouting camp in Europe. Applicants are screened by the BSA national office and the prospective host council. See "International Camp Staff program."

executive
Applies specifically to the Scout executive and generally to all professional Scouters.

executive board
(1) The National Executive Board is the governing body of the Boy Scouts of America. Voting memberships include regular membership, attained by election; ex officio membership, held by regional presidents, the chairman of the Advisory Council, and the chairman of the Board of Regents of the National Eagle Scout Association; and youth membership (at any time, the board may include five or fewer youth members appointed by the president). (2) The executive board in each local council is its policy-making body. Voting members include between 25 and 50 regular council members, the chairmen of the committees of the executive board, the chairmen of the district committees, and up to two youth members. The officers of the corporation, including the Scout executive, are nonvoting members. Capitalize "executive board" only in the name of a specific local council executive board or when reference is clearly to the National Executive Board: "Orange County Council Executive Board," "the executive board of the Greater St. Louis Area Council."

experience areas
Venturing is designed around social, citizenship, service, leadership, fitness, and outdoor experience areas.

Fahrenheit
The temperature scale commonly used in the United States. To convert to Centigrade, subtract 32 from the Fahrenheit figure, multiply by 5, and divide by 9 (77-32=45, 45(5=225, 225(9=25 degrees Centigrade). Generally, the Fahrenheit temperature scale is presumed if Centigade is not specified. See also "temperatures" and "Centigrade."

family
See "BSA Family program" and "whole Scouting family."

Family Award
See "BSA Family Award."

family camping
See "BSA family camping."

Famous Eagle
A camp at the S-F (pronounced "S bar F") Scout Ranch in Knob Lick, MO.  Camp Famous Eagle was named for the donor's company, Famous Barr. 

Fast Start training
Adult volunteer leadership training that immediately furnishes the information new leaders need to help them get started, help them understand what is expected of them, and assist in establishing effective meeting patterns. Combinations: "Boy Scout Leader Fast Start Training," "take Fast Start training."

federal
Use a capital letter for the architectural style and for corporate or governmental bodies that use the word as part of their formal names: "Federal Express," "the Federal Trade Commission." Lowercase when used as an adjective to distinguish something from state, county, city, town, or private entities: "federal taxes," "federal assistance," "federal court," "the federal government," "a federal judge."

federal charter
See "Charter of the Boy Scouts of America."

Fellowship Honor
A training award received after the Professional Circle. See "Professional Training Award."

50-Miler Award
The 50-Miler Award is presented to each qualifying individual for satisfactory participation in an approved trip. "50" is not spelled out.

Firem'n Chit
A recognition given to Boy Scouts who know and understand fire safety rules and that handling matches and building fires require responsibility.

First Class
The rank above Second Class Scout and below Star Scout in Boy Scouting. Combinations: "First Class Scout," "First Class rank," "achieve First Class."

First Class Emphasis
The First Class Emphasis increases the tenure of new Scouts by focusing on each Scout and his personal advancement needs.  The Scout needs to advance to the rank of First Class within his first year in Scouting.

firstnighter
Obsolete term for a special meeting held by each Venturing crew, usually in the fall, to recruit new members. The current term is "open house."

flier
Use instead of "flyer" to refer to small pieces of literature (such as those published by the BSA).

Florida National High Adventure Sea Base
Aquatics adventure programs, including canoeing, sailing, scuba diving, and exploring the reefs of the Florida Keys and the Bahamas, are offered for older Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, and Venturers. Address: Florida Sea Base; Boy Scouts of America; P.O. Box 1906; Islamorada (pronounced aisle-a-more-AH-dah), FL 33036. See "High Adventure Division."

fort
Do not abbreviate in names of cities or military installations: "Fort Worth," "Fort Bragg."

Founder's Award
A recognition program available to Order of the Arrow lodges. Up to four Arrowmen per year, based on lodge membership, can be recognized for exemplary service.

Founders Circle Award
For financial donors who make a deferred gift of $100,000 or more through a will or trust to benefit their local council endowment funds. The program includes four specific levels of recognition.

fractions
Spell out amounts less than 1 in text, using hyphens between the words: "two-thirds," "four-fifths," "seven-sixteenths," etc. Use figures for precise amounts larger than 1, converting to decimals whenever practical. In tabular material, use figures exclusively, converting to decimals if the amounts involve extensive use of fractions that cannot be expressed as a single character.

Francis X. Guardipee Grey Wolf Award
Given at the annual American Indian Boy Scouting/Girl Scouting Seminar for outstanding Boy Scouting and Girl Scouting service to Indian youth.

friend and counselor
See "Lone Boy Scout friend and counselor" or "Lone Cub Scout friend and counselor."

Friends Committee on Scouting
An advisory committee that guides the use of Scouting by the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) and promotes cooperation between it and the Boy Scouts of America.

Friends of Scouting (FOS)
Use this term instead of "Sustaining Membership Enrollment." An annual opportunity for Scouters and interested people in the community to be identified with the local council through their financial support and influence in the expansion of the council program. Enrollees are known as "Friends." See "Annual Giving Campaign."

full family of Scouting
See "whole Scouting family."

fund-raising, fund-raiser
Always use a hyphen.

George Meany Award
An AFL-CIO recognition presented to union members for outstanding service to the youth of their communities through Scouting.

gift annuity program
A contract between a council and donor whereby the donor, or donor's named beneficiary, receives annual payments for life. Also known as a charitable gift annuity.

Gilwell Park
The training center of the British Scout Association and the original homesite of Wood Badge training. Located in Epping Forest, England; chosen by Baden-Powell as the territorial designation for his peerage, Lord Baden-Powell of Gilwell.

Girl Scouts
The full name of the national organization is "Girl Scouts of the United States of America."

Gold Arrow Point
See "Arrow Point."

Gold Award, Venturing
The Gold Award is available to Venturers. It is designed to recognize significant accomplishment in a Venturer's life as he or she has proven outstanding performance in a broad spectrum of activities. Achievement of the Gold Award is a requirement for the Silver Award.

Gold Palm
See "Eagle Palms."

Good Turn
A distinctive feature of Boy Scouting is its emphasis on service to others. The Good Turn habit is one that all Scouts endeavor to acquire. See "Scout slogan."

Good Turn for America
A national service initiative by the BSA to address the issues of hunger, homelessness, and poor health. Participating organizations include the American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity, and The Salvation Army.

goodwill fund
A budget item for every Cub Scout pack, Boy Scout troop, and Varsity Scout team.

grade, grader
Hyphenate both noun and adjectival forms. Spell out references to grades one through nine; use figures for 10 and above: "first-grader"; "10th-grader"; "a fourth-grade student"; "she was in 12th grade."

grand howl
A special Cub Scout yell to recognize a leader or a Cub Scout's achievement. May also be used to close a den or pack meeting. See the Cub Scout Leader How-To Book.

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT)
See also "times and time zones."

Grey Wolf Award
See "Francis X. Guardipee Grey Wolf Award."

group
An administrative branch of the National Council; comprises divisions. Examples: "Program Group," "Administrative Group."

grubmaster
This Scout is in charge of patrol hike and camp menus and assembling food for outdoor patrol activities. He is appointed by the patrol leader.

guns
Gun is an acceptable term for any firearm. Note the following definitions:

  • caliber. A measurement of the diameter of the inside of a gun barrel except for most shotguns. Measurement is in either millimeters or decimal fractions of an inch. The word "caliber" is not used when giving the metric measurement. The forms: "a 9 mm pistol," "a .22-caliber rifle."
  • cartridge. ammunition for pistols and rifles containing the case, primer, powder and bullet.
  • gauge. This word describes the size of a shotgun. Gauge is expressed in terms of the number per pound of round lead balls with a diameter equal to the size of the barrel. The larger the number, the smaller the shotgun. Some common gauges are 10, 12, 16, 20, and 28. The .410 is actually a caliber; is never called a gauge.
  • muzzleloader. One word, no hyphen. A firearm in which the propellant and projectile are inserted down the barrel instead of through a breech mechanism. The forms: "firing a muzzleloader," "a muzzleloading shotgun," "a muzzleloading pistol."
  • pistol. A handgun. It may be "a single shot," "a semiautomatic," or "a revolver." Its measurement is in calibers or millimeters. The forms: "a .45-caliber pistol," "a 9 mm pistol," ".38-caliber revolver." 
  • revolver. A specific type of handgun or pistol. Its cartridges are held in chambers in a cylinder that revolves. The form: "a .38-caliber revolver."
  • rifle. A firearm designed or made to be fired from the shoulder and having a rifled bore. It uses bullets or cartridges for ammunition. Its size is measured in calibers. The form: "a .22-caliber rifle."
  • shell. The word applies to military ammunition and to shotgun ammunition.
  • shot. Small lead or steel pellets fired by shotguns. A shotgun shell usually contains 1 to 2 ounces of shot. Do not use "shot" interchangeably with "buckshot," which refers only to the largest shot sizes.
  • shotgun. A small-arms gun with a smooth bore, sometimes double-barreled. Its ammunition is shot. Its size is measured in gauges. The form: "a 12-gauge shotgun."

handicapped
Avoid using this term. See "disabilities."

Harris Poll
The Harris Poll is prepared by Louis Harris & Associates of New York.

HB9S
The World Scout Bureau headquarters ham radio station in Switzerland.

health care
Two words as a noun; hyphenated as an adjective: "Health care is expensive"; "she is a health-care worker."

health lodge
A quiet, properly equipped place in which to give temporary care to ill or injured campers.

Heritage Society
See "Scouting Heritage Society."

Heroism Award
A lifesaving award presented to a registered youth member or adult leader who has demonstrated heroism in saving or attempting to save a life at minimum risk to self. See "Honor Medal," "Medal of Merit," and "National Certificate of Merit."

high adventure
Can refer to high-adventure activities or to trek programs administered by local councils for older Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, and Venturers. Use a hyphen when the words are used as a modifier ("high-adventure program") except in titles of divisions and bases as noted in the Language of Scouting ("High Adventure Division").

High Adventure Division
This national office division develops and administers the national high-adventure program for older Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, and Venturers offered at the Florida National High Adventure Sea Base in the Florida Keys, the Double H High Adventure Base in central New Mexico, the Northern Tier National High Adventure Program in northern Minnesota and Canada, and Philmont Scout Ranch in northern New Mexico.

his, her
Do not presume maleness in constructing a sentence. If possible, recast in the plural to avoid wordiness. Avoid: "A district executive should keep his volunteer records organized." Better: "A district executive should keep his or her volunteer records organized." Even better: "District executives should keep their volunteer records organized."

Hispanic Emphasis
This special effort of the BSA makes an effort to bring Scouting to Hispanic communities, where it has traditionally been difficult to establish the program.

Historic Trails Award
An award that may be earned by members of a Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, or Venturing crew for hiking a trail listed in Nationally Approved Historic Trails and completing a project related to the trail.

home office
Formerly, the term used for "national office." Appropriate only in a historical context.

home page
Two words.

Honor Medal
A lifesaving award presented to a registered youth member or adult leader who has demonstrated unusual heroism in saving or attempting to save a life at considerable risk to self. May also be presented with crossed palms when both unusual heroism and extraordinary skill or resourcefulness are demonstrated in saving or attempting to save a life at extreme risk to self. See "Heroism Award," "Medal of Merit," and "National Certificate of Merit."

Honor Patrol Award
An embroidered star worn beneath the patrol medallion distinguishes a member of a patrol that has won this award by meeting requirements in patrol spirit; patrol meetings; hikes, outdoor activities, and other events; Good Turns or service projects; advancement; membership; uniform; and patrol leaders' council attendance. Formerly known as the Baden-Powell Patrol Award.

Honor Unit Award, BSA
Presented annually by councils to units for achievement in membership growth, quality program, and leadership training.

Hornaday Award
See "William T. Hornaday Award."

Humanics
See "American Humanics Inc."

hyphen
See "punctuation."

immediate recognition patch
This Cub Scout patch indicates how Cub Scouts are progressing in rank. A yellow bead (called a Progress Toward Ranks bead) is presented for each three Wolf achievements earned; red beads are presented for each three Bear achievements earned. Cub Scouts may wear this patch until they become Webelos Scouts.

in, into
In indicates location: "He was in the room." "Into" indicates motion: "She walked into the room."

Indian Camperships
A program that provides summer camp fees for Scouts of American Indian lineage. Sometimes referred to as the Maury Clancy Indian Campership Fund.

INFOMARK
The term formerly used to identify fund-raising, fiscal management, and endowment initiatives under the auspices of the Finance Support Division.

initials
Use periods and a space between initials when an individual uses initials instead of a first name: H. L. Mencken; T. S. Eliot. Do not use periods (or spaces) for instances such as LBJ or JFK.

instructor
(1) This youth leader helps other youth members with rank advancement; appointed by the senior patrol leader with the Scoutmaster's advice and consent. (2) This term can also apply to any youth or adult who can instruct others on parts of the Scouting program.

International Camp Staff program
Local councils throughout the United States may invite qualified Scouters from other countries to be a part of their summer camp and Cub Scout day camp programs. Applicants are screened by their own Scout associations, the BSA national office, and the prospective host council.

international commissioner
A volunteer Scouter who represents the Boy Scouts of America in matters dealing with other national Scout organizations and with the World Organization of the Scout Movement.

International Letter of Introduction
A document of the World Organization of the Scout Movement, issued by the individual member associations and recognized worldwide as an official means of identification with the movement. For members of the BSA, it is issued by the International Division.

Internet
Always capitalize. Also referred to as the Net.

interpreter strip
A badge available to Boy Scouts who can write, translate, and speak a foreign language or can carry on a conversation in sign language.

Intranet
See "BSA Intranet."

Intravest
An optional program available to councils (through the National Council) that want assistance with their endowment trust fund investments.

introduction to leadership
Initial briefing of newly selected troop youth leaders conducted by the Scoutmaster, senior patrol leader, and other leaders. See "Troop Leadership Training."

investiture
A ceremony placing the responsibilities of an office or rank upon an individual.

Islam
Followers of Islam are called Muslims (not "Moslems").

Islamorada
Site of the Florida National High Adventure Sea Base. It is pronounced aisle-a-more-AH-dah.

italics
Use italics in the following situations: for emphasis (but use sparingly), for some composition titles (see "composition titles"), for new vocabulary, and for foreign words that are not listed in the dictionary.

jamboree
A term chosen by Baden-Powell to describe the first international gathering of Scouts camping together in London in 1920. The term is restricted to indicate a national or world jamboree. Not capitalized unless in the title of a specific jamboree, as: "1993 National Scout Jamboree" or "19th World Scout Jamboree." The BSA has a national jamboree every four years. See "contingent" regarding the use of the word to describe Scouting groups attending a jamboree.

jamboree emblem
A jamboree emblem may be worn by any member who is registered to attend a jamboree or who has attended a jamboree as a registered participant or staff member. Only one jamboree emblem (world or national) may be worn.

Jamboree Health and Safety Service
Note the capitalization.

Jamboree Leader Fitness Award
Available to adult leaders attending a national jamboree, the award's objectives are to encourage youth fitness in the BSA by providing positive role models, encourage physical fitness among Scouters by enhancing their awareness and understanding, and reduce the rate of stress- and fitness-related incidents at jamborees and throughout Scouting.

Jamboree-on-the-Air (JOTA)
The World Scout Bureau of the World Organization of the Scout Movement sponsors the Jamboree-on-the-Air, held the third full weekend of October each year. This worldwide ham radio event promotes communication and understanding among Scouts all over the world. The BSA's participation is coordinated by the International Division. See "K2BSA" and "HB9S."

jamborette
A camporee or camporall involving Scouting units of neighboring nations. Not capitalized unless used in the title of a specific jamborette.

James E. West Fellowship Award
Named in honor of the first Chief Scout Executive, this award is given to individuals donating $1,000 or more in cash or securities, beyond their regular contribution, to local council endowment trust funds.

James E. West Fellowship program
See "James E. West Fellowship Award."

job
Avoid this word; use "position," "responsibility," or "career," depending on context.

junior assistant Scoutmaster
A troop may have any number of junior assistant Scoutmasters. They are 16- or 17-year-old Scouts who help the senior patrol leader; they are appointed by him, with the Scoutmaster's advice and consent.

junior, senior
Abbreviate "Jr." and "Sr." only after a full name and do not precede by a comma: John F. Kennedy Jr.

K2BSA
The BSA headquarters ham radio station in Fort Worth, Texas. See "HB9S" and "Jamboree-on-the-Air."

Kanik
The Kanik snow camping program is offered by Philmont Scout Ranch. Ski touring, snow shelter building, snow camping, winter ecology, use of winter tools and equipment, and techniques for designing and making equipment are featured. Kanik (pronounced CAN-ick) is from the Eskimo word for "snowflake." See "Okpik" and "National Cold-Weather Camping Development Center."

Kayaking BSA
A recognition given to Scouts and Venturers who demonstrate knowledge and proficiency in kayaking.

Key 3
(1) The council Key 3: the council president, council commissioner, and Scout executive; (2) the district Key 3: the district chairman, district commissioner, and district executive. The numeral "3" is always used in Key 3; it is not spelled out.

KISMIF
A Cub Scouting acronym standing for "Keep It Simple, Make It Fun."

Kit Carson Museum
Located at Philmont Scout Ranch.

Klondike derby
A competitive Boy Scout event conducted by patrols to demonstrate proficiency in Scouting skills. Traditionally conducted in winter. Patrols move from station to station pulling equipment on a replica of a Klondike gold rush sled.

kwik kalendar
A computerized work schedule backdating program, provided by Council Information Systems at the national office for use by local council employees.

Labor Advisory Committee
See "National Labor Advisory Committee."

Lamb Award
An award given through the Lutheran Council in the U.S.A. to Lutheran laity and pastors who have rendered exceptional service to youth through Scouting.

Law of the Pack
The Cub Scout follows Akela.
The Cub Scout helps the pack go.
The pack helps the Cub Scout grow.
The Cub Scout gives goodwill.

Law, the Scout
See "Scout Law."

LDS Church
See "Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints."

leader
See "officer," "professional Scouter," "unit leader," and "volunteer."

leader-specific training
The basic course of training for adult leaders, beginning with New Leader Essentials and progressing to leader-specific courses such as Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmaster Leader Specific Training and Varsity Coach and Assistant Coach Leader Specific Training.

Leadership Award
Available to youth and adult volunteers registered and involved in Venturing. The Venturing Leadership Award is presented by councils, areas/regions, and the BSA National Council to Venturers and adult volunteers who have made exceptional contributions to Venturing and who exemplify the Venturing Code and Oath.

Leadership Update
A supplemental training experience for Cub Scout leaders conducted monthly by the district.

Leave No Trace
The BSA is committed to this nationally recognized outdoor skills and ethics awareness program to reduce impacts on the environment and other people. The seven principles should be followed at all times in the outdoors: Plan ahead and prepare; camp and travel on durable surfaces; pack it in, pack it out; leave what you find; minimize campfire use; respect wildlife; and respect others. When used as an adjective, capitalize and do not hyphenate: "Follow all Leave No Trace principles in the backcountry."

Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines
See "Cub Scout Leave No Trace Pledge."

Legacy of Servant Leadership Lifetime Achievement Award
An honor given by the Order of the Arrow.

librarian
A Scout who supervises the use of troop-owned books; appointed by the senior patrol leader with the Scoutmaster's advice and consent.

Life Scout
The rank below Eagle Scout and above Star Scout.

Lifeguard BSA
See "BSA Lifeguard."

lifesaving awards
See "Heroism Award," "Honor Medal," and "National Court of Honor."

-like
Do not use a hyphen unless the "l" is tripled: "businesslike," "lifelike," "shell-like."

lists
In an enumerated list that is run into the text, enclose numbers in parentheses and do not introduce the list with a colon unless using the words "the following" or some such: "For lunch he ate (1) a sandwich, (2) dried apricots, and (3) a Twinkie." "For lunch he ate the following: (1) a sandwich, (2) dried apricots, and (3) a Twinkie."

Other examples:

  • "Her lunch included the following: a sandwich, dried apricots, and a Twinkie." (Use a colon.)
    BUT
    "Her lunch included a sandwich, dried apricots, and a Twinkie." (No colon.)
  • "The following procedures are not covered:
    Skilled home health care
    A private nurse CAT scan"
    (Note: No periods after the listed items; use of a colon to introduce because of the use of "the following"; use of capital letters for the listed items)
  • "The procedures that are not covered include
    Skilled home health care
    A private nurse
    CAT scan"
    (Note: No colon to introduce the listed items.)
  • "After careful investigation, the health insurance provider concluded that
    • the skilled home health care was unnecessary,
    • the private nurse overcharged,
    • the CAT scan was too expensive."
    (Note: The listed items complete the sentence so they begin with lowercase letters and are separated by commas. No punctuation is used to introduce the list. In a vertical list such as this one, "and" is unnecessary in the listed items; however, you would use it if the list were not vertical: "After careful investigation, the health insurance provider concluded that the skilled home health care was unnecessary, the private nurse overcharged, and the CAT scan was too expensive.")
  • "After careful investigation, the health insurance provider concluded several things:
    1. The home health care was unnecessary.
    2. The private nurse overcharged.
    3. The CAT scan was too expensive."
    (The listed items are each a sentence in and of themselves, so they begin with a capital letter and end with a period.)

Living Circle
A Cub Scout ceremony. See the Cub Scout Leader Book.

loaned executive
A full-time or part-time person whose salary, including benefits, is paid directly by the "loaning" organization but who is temporarily assigned, by the primary employer, to perform a specific assignment (other than an approved professional position) for the Boy Scouts of America.

local council
An administrative body chartered by the National Council to be responsible for Scouting in a designated geographic territory. Voting membership may include active members at large and chartered organization representatives. The program is directed by an executive board of volunteers and administered by a Scout executive and staff of professional Scouters. There are about 300 local councils in the United States. The number changes as councils merge and split. The term council is not capitalized except in the name of a specific council. Combinations: "councilwide," "Quivira Council," "council executive board," "Longhorn Council Executive Board." See "executive board" and "National Council."

Local Council Certificate of Merit
This may be awarded for meritorious actions that do not qualify for the National Certificate of Merit. See "Heroism Award," "Honor Medal," "Medal of Merit," and "National Certificate of Merit."

local council service center
See "service center."

local tour permit
See "tour permit."

lodge
A local council Order of the Arrow group chartered annually by the National Council. A large lodge may be organized into chapters.

Lone Boy Scout
A Boy Scout who, unable to join a troop because of unusual conditions, follows the program as an individual under the leadership of a Lone Scout friend and counselor. See also "Lone Cub Scout."

Lone Boy Scout friend and counselor
A Scouter who works with a Lone Scout.

Lone Cub Scout
A Cub Scout who, unable to join a pack because of unusual conditions, follows the program as an individual under the leadership of a Lone Cub Scout friend and counselor. See also "Lone Boy Scout."

Lone Cub Scout friend and counselor
A Cub Scouter who works with a Lone Cub Scout.

-long
When in doubt, consult a dictionary, but usually no hyphen: yearlong, weeklong.

Long Cruise arc
A red Long Cruise arc worn over the Long Cruise badge represents an additional two-week cruise. When five have been completed, the red arcs are replaced by one white arc.

Long Cruise badge
An award given to Sea Scouts of Ordinary rank who have completed a two-week cruise.

long-term camping
A camping experience consisting of five or more consecutive days and nights in the outdoors.

loss prevention
Preventing accidents, reducing injuries, and minimizing costs, both personal and financial, are the objectives of the BSA's emphasis on loss prevention.

low-impact ethic
See "Leave No Trace."

lunchoree
A fund-raising luncheon, usually industry oriented.

Lutheran churches
The three major Lutheran bodies in the United States merged in 1988 to form the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod is a separate and distinct body.

-ly
Do not use a hyphen between adverbs ending in "-ly" and the adjectives they modify: "an easily remembered rule," "a badly damaged car."

magazine titles
Italicize titles of magazines. Lowercase the word "magazine" unless it is part of the publication's formal title: Boys' Life magazine; Harper's Magazine. Also see "composition titles."

man, mankind
Try to use a term that is gender-neutral: human, humanity, humankind.

manager
See "program manager."

manpower
Try to use a term that is gender-neutral: workforce, personnel, staff.

Marketing & Communications Division
The arm of the National Council Development & Strategic Initiatives Group that oversees communication between the Boy Scouts of America and the public. See "division."

Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Do not use a comma before or after "Jr."

mate
The Sea Scouting equivalent of associate Advisor. See "boatswain's mate" and "Skipper."

Medal of Merit
May be awarded by the National Court of Honor to a registered youth member or adult leader who has performed an act of service of a rare or exceptional character. Such action need not necessarily be a rescue or involve risk to self. See "Heroism Award," "Honor Medal," and "National Certificate of Merit."

Meher Baba
A spiritual leader born in India in 1894. He established a spiritual center in South Carolina in the 1950s.

member
See "local council," "National Council," and "registered member."

member at large
(1) Elected voting member of a council or district who is not a chartered organization representative. (2) Voting member of the National Council other than a local council representative.

Members of Churches of Christ for Scouting
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the United Church of Christ and the Boy Scouts of America.

membership inventory
Part of a unit's annual charter renewal process when the activity of the unit during the past year is reviewed. Usually held in conjunction with a uniform inspection.

merit badge
A recognition given to a Boy Scout for completing the requirements for the badge. There are more than a hundred subjects in life skills, hobby, and career fields, with requirements and supporting pamphlets to help Scouts broaden their outlook. Capitalize the name but not the words "merit badge." Example: "earn the Lifesaving and Swimming merit badges." When referring to the merit badge pamphlet, italicize the title. Example: "Journalism merit badge pamphlet."

merit badge counselor
A registered adult volunteer at least age 18 who is expert in a merit badge field and shares enthusiasm for that field with Scouts and who certifies that requirements have been met.

merit badge show
A demonstration of merit badge skills from booths. Spectators walk around and participate in the merit badge features that interest them.

meritorious action awards
See "Medal of Merit" and "National Certificate of Merit."

Methodist churches
The principal Methodist body in the United States is the United Methodist Church. It was formed in 1968 by the merger of the Methodist Church and the Evangelical United Brethren Church. Methodism in the United States also includes three major African American denominations: the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, and the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church.

methods of Scouting
The eight methods are the ideals (Scout Oath, Law, motto, and slogan), patrol method, outdoors, advancement, association with adults, personal growth, leadership development, and the uniform.

Mile Swim BSA
A recognition given to Scouts and Venturers to encourage the development of physical fitness and stamina through swimming.

military academies
Capitalize "U.S. Air Force Academy," "U.S. Coast Guard Academy," "U.S. Military Academy," "U.S. Naval Academy." Retain capitalization if the "U.S." is dropped: "the Air Force Academy," etc. Lowercase "academy" whenever it stands alone.

military titles
Capitalize and abbreviate a military rank when used as a formal title before an individual's full name: Gen. John J. Pershing, but General Pershing.

millions, billions
Use figures with "million" or "billion" in all except casual uses: "I'd like to make a billion dollars." But: "The nation has 1 million citizens"; "I need $7 billion." Do not go beyond two decimals: "7.51 million people," "$256 billion," "7,542,500 people," "$2,565,750,000." Decimals are preferred where practical: "1.5 million"; not "1 1/2 million."

Do not drop the word "million" or "billion" in the first figure of a range: "He is worth from $2 million to $4 million"; not "He is worth $2 to $4 million," unless you really mean $2.

months
Spell out and capitalize months of the year.

Moravian
A member of a Protestant denomination that arose from a 15th-century religious reform movement in Bohemia and Moravia.

Mormon
See "Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints."

motto
See "Cub Scout motto" or "Scout motto."

mount
Spell out in all uses, including the names of communities and mountains: "Mount Prospect, Illinois"; "Mount Everest."

movement
See "Scouting movement."

museums
See "Kit Carson Museum," "Seton Memorial Library and Philmont Museum," and "National Scouting Museum."

MyBSA
www.mybsa.org is a centralized intranet location where BSA and local council employees can, from any Internet-connected computer, access their BSA e-mail accounts, Scouting news, network support, software training, links to BSA information, and many other resources.

MyScouting
An Internet portal for our members that provides access to their account data, automated tour permit applications, the E-Learning Course Management System, and more.

National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience (NAYLE)
Conducted at Philmont Scout Ranch, this advanced training is designed to prepare Boy Scout youth leaders for positions of leadership.

National Annual Business Meeting
Always capitalize.

National Annual Meeting
Always capitalize.

national anthem
Lowercase; but, "The Star-Spangled Banner."

National Association of Christian Methodist Episcopal Scouters
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church and the Boy Scouts of America.

National Association of Episcopals for Scouting
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the Episcopal Church and the Boy Scouts of America.

National Association of Presbyterian Scouters
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the Presbyterian churches and the Boy Scouts of America.

National Association of United Methodist Scouters
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the United Methodist Church and the Boy Scouts of America.

National Boy Scouts of America Foundation
A foundation established to provide a convenient way for a donor to make one gift but have it distributed among several Scouting entities. The foundation can also serve as trustee for a wide variety of charitable gifts benefiting Scouting.

National Camping Award
This award recognizes troops that go camping during the year. Recognition is for the number of camping days and nights logged on a yearly basis or on a cumulative basis. Yearly awards are the unit award, 10 days and nights; bronze award, 20 days and nights; silver award, 30 days and nights; and gold award, 50 days and nights. Cumulative awards are the unit award, 100 days and nights; bronze award, 250 days and nights; silver award, 500 days and nights; and gold award, 1,000 days and nights.

National Camping School
A weeklong training experience for adults who are key staff members in council camp operations, including Management, Program, Ranger, Commissioner, Chaplain, Aquatics, Climbing, Project COPE, Ecology/Conservation, Outdoor Skills, Shooting Sports, and Trek Leader.

National Catholic Committee on Scouting
An advisory committee that promotes and guides cooperation between the proper authorities of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States and the Boy Scouts of America.

National Certificate of Merit
This award may be presented by the National Court of Honor to a registered BSA member, youth or adult, who has performed a significant act of service that is deserving of special national recognition. Such action need not involve attempts of rescue or risk to self, but puts into practice Scouting skills or ideals. See "Heroism Award," "Honor Medal," "Local Council Certificate of Merit," and "Medal of Merit."

National Cold-Weather Camping Development Center
Located at the Northern Tier Base at Ely, Minnesota, the center provides materials for, and specializes in problems associated with, cold-weather camping for councils and other organizations. See "Kanik," "Okpik," and "High Adventure Division."

National Community Relationships Committee
This advisory committee promotes and guides efforts between fraternal and community groups, the military, and the Boy Scouts of America.

National Council
This is the corporate membership chartered by the United States Congress to operate the program of the Boy Scouts of America. Members include all elected members of the National Executive Board, members of regional executive committees, elected local council representatives, elected members at large, and elected (nonvoting) honorary members. The program of the National Council is directed by the National Executive Board and administered by the Chief Scout Executive and a staff of professional Scouters at the national office and in other locations. Biennial National Council meetings are held, such as the 1992 National Council Meeting.

National Court of Honor
A committee of the Boy Scouts of America that is responsible for administering lifesaving awards, meritorious action awards, and distinguished service awards.

National Crime Prevention program
See "BSA National Crime Prevention program."

National Den Award
An award to recognize Cub Scout dens that provide quality year-round program.

National Distribution Center
The Supply Division warehouse from which BSA equipment and supplies are dispensed. The address is 2109 Westinghouse Blvd.; P.O. Box 7143; Charlotte, NC 28241-7143.

National Eagle Scout Association
This group provides an opportunity for all Eagle Scouts to retain identification with Scouting through service to the local council in which they live.  Founded in 1974 and paterned after the Eagle Scout Association, fouded in St. Louis, MO in 1947.

National Endowment Achievement Award
Recognition of local council achievement of approved annual endowment fund income goal.

National Executive Board
See "executive board."

National Executive Institute
No longer used; forerunner to Professional Development Levels 1, 2, and 3 courses. See "Center for Professional Development."

National Islamic Committee on Scouting
An advisory committee that guides the use of Scouting by Islamic youth-serving organizations and promotes cooperation between them and the Boy Scouts of America.

National Jewish Committee on Scouting
An advisory committee that guides the use of Scouting by Jewish youth-serving organizations and promotes cooperation between them and the Boy Scouts of America.

National Labor Advisory Committee
An advisory committee to the Boy Scouts of America with the responsibility of promoting and guiding cooperative contacts between organized labor and the Boy Scouts of America.

National Leadership Seminar
A weekend leadership training conference conducted by the Order of the Arrow at the regional level.

National Lutheran Association on Scouting
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the Lutheran churches and the Boy Scouts of America.

national office
The address of the administrative offices of the Boy Scouts of America is Boy Scouts of America, 1325 West Walnut Hill Lane, P.O. Box 152079, Irving, TX 75015-2079. "Home office" is not used except in historical references.

National Order of the Arrow Conference
A biennial conference designed to improve program and leadership skills of all Arrowmen. Training, activities, shows, and Indian events are included in this five-day, even-year event.

National Polish Catholic Committee on Scouting
This advisory committee promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the Polish National Catholic Church and the Boy Scouts of America.

National President's Scoutmaster Award of Merit
A recognition given to a Scoutmaster who has made a significant contribution to boys' achievement of the Eagle Scout rank.

National Religious Relationships Committee
An advisory committee that promotes and guides cooperative efforts between the various religious bodies and the Boy Scouts of America.

national Scout jamboree
See "jamboree."

National Scouting Museum
The National Scouting Museum includes the world's largest collection of original Norman Rockwell Scouting oil paintings, Scouting exhibits, a theater, galleries, and games. Address and telephone number are National Scouting Museum; 1329 West Walnut Hill Lane, P.O. Box 152079, Irving, TX 75015-2079; 972-580-2100 or 800-303-3047.

National Standard Camp Rating
The method used by the BSA for accrediting physical facilities, staff, program, development, and provisions for the health and safety of camps.

National Summertime Pack Award
A Cub Scout pack can earn this certificate and streamer by planning and conducting three pack activities—one each in June, July, and August. Cub Scouts who participate in all three activities may wear the National Summertime Pack Award pin.

national tour permit
See "tour permit."

National Training School
No longer used: A training institute for professional Scouters that took place at the Schiff Scout Reservation. This training has evolved into Professional Development Levels 1, 2, and 3 courses at the BSA's Center for Professional Development. See "Center for Professional Development."

National Youth Leadership Training
A weeklong experience for youth leaders conducted by the council. See "introduction to leadership" and "Troop Leadership Training."

nationalities and races
Capitalize the proper names of nationalities, peoples, races, tribes, etc.: "Arab," "Arabic," "African," "American," "Caucasian," "Cherokee," "Chinese," "Eskimo," "French Canadian," "Gypsy," "Japanese," "Jew," "Jewish," "Latin," "Nordic," "Sioux," "Swede," etc. Lowercase "black" (noun or adjective), "white," etc.

Nationally Coordinated Campaign for Local Council Endowment
This program of emphasis launched in 1993 is designed to assist local councils in generating additional gifts to their endowment fund.

Native American
See "American Indian," which is preferred.

Net
Short for the Internet.

New Church, The
See "Church of the New Jerusalem."

new-Scout patrol
When a boy joins a Boy Scout troop, he becomes a member of a patrol composed of new Scouts, where an assistant Scoutmaster and a troop guide help him get a good start in Scouting.

new-unit campaign
A systematic approach to organizing a large number of units that includes techniques for recruiting the right volunteers, careful planning and scheduling, and an effective publicity campaign.

1910 Society
1910 Society

no-trace camping
Refers to the Leave No Trace principles for techniques that minimize the effects of Scouting groups on the environment. See also "Leave No Trace."

no-trace ethic
Refers to the Leave No Trace principles. The no-trace ethic should always be practiced in the outdoors, but more care is needed in areas that show few signs of modern human activity. To follow Leave No Trace ethic, such an area would be left in a natural state by removing all evidence that anyone had been there. See also "Leave No Trace."

Northern Expeditions Base
This base in Bissett, Manitoba, Canada, offers wilderness canoeing and fishing. See "Northern Tier National High Adventure Program."

Northern Tier National High Adventure Program
The Charles L. Sommers High Adventure Base in Ely, Minnesota, the Northern Expeditions Base in Bissett, Manitoba, Canada, and the Donald Rogert Canoeing High Adventure Base in Atikokan, Ontario, Canada, serve as launching points for canoeing, fishing, and camping by older Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, Venturers, and families of registered adult BSA members. Cold-weather camping is offered only at the Ely base camp. The mailing address is Northern Tier National High Adventure; Boy Scouts of America; P.O. Box 509; Ely, MN 55731-0509. See "High Adventure Division," "National Cold-Weather Camping Development Center," and "Okpik."

Now & Then
A quarterly newsletter for the retired men and women of Scouting.

numerals
In general, spell out whole numbers below 10 (one through nine); use figures for 10 and above. Typical examples: "They had three sons and two daughters." "They had a fleet of 10 station wagons and two buses."

IN A SERIES: Apply the appropriate guidelines: "They had 10 dogs, six cats, and 97 hamsters." "They had four four-room houses, 10 three-room houses, and 12 10-room houses."

SENTENCE START: Spell out a numeral at the beginning of a sentence. If necessary, recast the sentence. There is one exception-a numeral that identifies a calendar year (but try to recast the sentence to avoid this). Wrong: "993 Scouts attended our council's summer camp last year." Right: "Last year, 993 Scouts attended our council's summer camp."

oath
See "Scout Oath or Promise."

office
Council service center and "regional service center" are preferred to "council office" and "regional office." "National office" is correct; the national office does not perform services of the type offered at local council and regional service centers.

officer
(1) The National Council, each region, and each council have elected volunteer officers who act on behalf of the executive board between board meetings. (2) In Venturing the elected youth officers typically are president, vice president, secretary, and treasurer. (3) In Sea Scouting the elected youth officers (called "petty officers") typically are boatswain, boatswain's mate, yeoman, purser, and storekeeper. (4) In Sea Scouting, the Skipper and mates, who are adult leaders, are called officers.

official
(1) One who holds or is invested with an office. (2) An adjective used to describe BSA equipment and uniforms approved for use in the program.

OK, OK'd, OK'ing, OKs
Do not use "okay."

Okpik (pronounced OOK-pik)
The Okpik Cold Weather Camping Program is offered by the Northern Tier National High Adventure Program. Cold-weather camping, cross-country skiing, dog sledding, ice fishing, snowshoeing, expedition travel, and shelter building are featured. Okpik is derived from the Eskimo word for "snowy owl." See "Kanik" and "National Cold-Weather Camping Development Center."

olympics
Capitalize all references to the international athletic contests held every four years: "the Olympics," "the Winter Olympics," "the Olympic Games," "the Games," "an Olympic-sized pool" (which is 50 meters long by 25 meters wide). Lowercase other uses: "a pizza-eating olympics."

online
Use one word, no hyphen, for the computer connection term.

open house
A special meeting held by each Venturing crew, usually in the fall, to recruit new members. Formerly called a "firstnighter."

Operation First Class
Obsolete term; see "Scoutreach Division."

Ordeal membership
The induction phase of membership in the Order of the Arrow. A candidate becomes an Ordeal member upon completion of the Ordeal and Ordeal ceremony.

Order of the Arrow
Scouting's national honor society. Youth members (Arrowmen) must hold First Class Scout rank; they are elected by all youth members of the troop, based on their Scouting spirit and camping ability. The aim of the OA is to promote the outdoor program and service to Scouting.

Ordinary
The rank in Sea Scouting above Apprentice and below Able. Combinations: "Ordinary Award," "Ordinary rank," "Ordinary requirements," "Ordinary Sea Scout."

orienteering
A cross-country contest to reach a specific destination and/or certain checkpoints with the use of compass and map.

Outdoor Code
As an American, I will do my best to-

Be clean in my outdoor manners. I will treat the outdoors as a heritage. I will take care of it for myself and others. I will keep my trash and garbage out of lakes, streams, fields, woods, and roadways.

Be careful with fire. I will prevent wildfire. I will build my fires only when and where they are permitted and appropriate. When I have finished using fire, I will make sure it is cold-out. I will leave a clean fire ring, or remove all evidence of my fire.

Be considerate in the outdoors. I will treat public and private property with respect. I will follow the principles of Leave No Trace for all outdoors activities.

Be conservation-minded. I will learn about and practice good conservation of soil, waters, forests, minerals, grasslands, wildlife, and energy. I will urge others to do the same.

outdoor program
The total scope of outdoor activities offered by the Boy Scouts of America, in which youth members' differing skill and experience levels are accommodated. Includes Cub Scout overnighters, day camp, council-organized family camps, and resident camp; Webelos Scout overnight camping; Boy Scout overnight, resident, and long-term camping; Venture and Varsity activities; jamborees; council and national high adventure; and wilderness camping.

outdoor skills
Skills for living in the outdoors: using shelter for protection, building fires for food preparation, knowing the skills of field sanitation, and properly using woods tools. Not "campcraft," "Scoutcraft," or "woodcraft."

overnighter
See "Webelos Scout overnighter."

pack
A group made up of several Tiger Cub, Cub Scout, and Webelos Scout dens. The pack includes not only the boys in the dens but also their families and leaders. Combinations: "Cub Scout pack," "Pack 5."

Palms
See "Eagle Palms."

Pan American jamboree
The treatment of this term varies by actual jamboree year; for instance, no hyphen for the 1994 Pan American Jamboree.

paraprofessional
A registered, full-time or part-time noncommissioned employee whose application has been filed and approved by the Human Resources Administration Division for service in a designated paraprofessional position. Authority and duties are limited to the support of, and are under the direction of, the commissioned professional assigned to that specific area of responsibility.

parent and family talent survey
An inventory of parents' interests and abilities conducted by the Cub Scout pack to determine program potential.

parents' night
An open house conducted by a Venturing crew to inform parents and involve them in the Venturing crew and council.

partner
Do not use "partner" when referring to a chartered organization. Also see "adult partner."

patrol
A small group of Boy Scouts (usually five to eight) who belong to a troop and work together in and out of troop meetings. Normally, there are several patrols in one troop. Capitalize only when part of a title, such as "Fox Patrol." See also "Venture patrol." Note: Webelos dens are not patrols.

patrol leader
Elected by the patrol members, this Boy Scout leads the patrol and represents it on the patrol leaders' council, which plans the troop program.

patrol leaders' council
Each patrol leader, representing his patrol, meets with other patrol leaders and the senior patrol leader to plan their troop program. The Scoutmaster acts as an adviser.

Paul Bunyan Woodsman
A recognition given to a Boy Scout or a Venturer who safely demonstrates skill with a long-handle ax.

Pedro
The long-eared, four-footed mailburro of the "Hitchin' Rack" column in Boys' Life magazine.

people, persons
Use "person" when speaking of an individual: "One person waited for the bus." The word "people" is preferred to "persons" in all plural uses. For example: "Thousands of people attended the fair." "What will people say?" "There were 17 people in the room." "Persons" should be used only when it is in a direct quote or part of a title as in "Bureau of Missing Persons."

percent and percentages
Percent is one word and always spelled out. Also, always use figures for percentages: 2 percent, 25 percent, 2.5 percent (use decimals, not fractions). For amounts less than 1 percent, precede the decimal with a zero: "The cost of living rose 0.6 percent." Repeat "percent" with each individual figure: "He said 10 percent to 30 percent of the electorate may not vote."

petty officer
An elected youth officer in a Sea Scout ship. A petty officer in a Sea Scout ship is the equivalent of an officer in a Venturing crew. They are typically boatswain, boatswain's mate, yeoman, purser, and storekeeper.

Philmont Scout Ranch
Western high adventure happens here for older Scouts and Venturers in almost 140,000 acres of rugged northern New Mexico. The ranch also has a center for volunteer and professional training. The address is Cimarron, NM 87714. (Cimarron is pronounced sim-a-ROAN.)

Philmont Staff Association
Former and current summer and permanent staff members of Philmont Scout Ranch, and of the Philmont Training Center, Cimarron, New Mexico, are eligible for membership. Some association objectives are to promote wilderness camping and other ranch programs, suggest new programs in ranch management, and offer time and talent to local councils for promoting the ranch.

Philmont Training Center
The national volunteer training center of the BSA, located at Philmont Scout Ranch. The center hosts professional and BSA local council conferences.

pinewood derby�
A pack activity that involves making and racing small wooden cars on a track. Combinations: "Pack 1 Pinewood Derby," "the pinewood derby."

planned giving
Making a gift to Scouting as the result of a planning process that takes into consideration the effects that gift will have on the donor's income, tax liabilities, and estate. Do not hyphenate, even when used as a modifier. Also known as "deferred giving."

plurals
With figures, add s: "Temperatures will be in the 20s"; "I was born in the 1950s." With single letters, add 's: "The three R's of Youth Protection." With multiple letters, add s: "She knows her ABCs."

pooled income fund
A charitable trust to which donors make gifts, which are pooled with other gifts and then invested. The investment income is paid to the donor, or beneficiaries, quarterly for life. Upon maturity the council endowment fund receives the remainder interest.

Pope Paul VI national unit recognition
A recognition given by the National Catholic Committee on Scouting to units organized by Catholic churches and organizations.

possessives
Some general guidelines for more troublesome matters:

  • Plural nouns ending in s: Add only an apostrophe-"the horses' food," "the girls' toys," "states' rights," "officers' meeting," "Chief Scout Executive's Winners' Circle."
  • Some words ending in s do not take the apostrophe if they are being used in a descriptive sense: "Teamsters union," "citizens band radio," "a writers guide." A Scouting example: "Founders Circle Award."
  • Singular nouns ending in s: Add 's unless the next word begins with s: "the witness's answer," but "the witness' story."
  • Singular proper names ending in s: Add only an apostrophe-"Achilles' heel," "Dickens' books," "Kansas' schools."
  • Pronouns: Be careful not to use an apostrophe with "yours," "ours," "hers," "its," and "theirs."
  • Joint possession: Use the possessive form after only the last word if ownership is joint: "Jason and Bill's tent" (both Jason and Bill own the tent). Use a possessive form after both words if the objects are individually owned: "Jason's and Bill's tents" (Jason and Bill each have a tent).

post office
Lowercase to refer to a specific office, but the agency is now called the U.S. Postal Service - USPS.

pow wow
A one-day training conference for Cub Scout leaders. Combinations: "Cub Scout leader pow wow," "Apache District Pow Wow."

P.R.A.Y.
Abbreviation for Programs of Religious Activities With Youth. An organization outside the BSA that administers religious awards for youth-serving organizations, including the BSA, Girl Scouts, and Camp Fire. Note the periods in the abbreviation.

prefixes
More often than not, you'll find that a hyphen is not needed. Refer to the latest edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary. Some general rules: (1) Do not hyphenate a prefix with a word that starts with a consonant: "pretax," "nonbeliever," "nontraditional," "unconvinced," "coworker," "extraterrestrial," "multicolored," "postwar." (2) Except for "cooperate" and "coordinate," use a hyphen if the prefix ends in a vowel and the word following begins with the same vowel: "co-ownership," "pre-exist," "pre-empt," "re-establish." (3) Use a hyphen if the word that follows is capitalized: "mid-Atlantic." (4) Use a hyphen to join doubled prefixes: "sub-subparagraph."

preprofessional
A paraprofessional who is currently pursuing either an associate's or a bachelor's degree while obtaining on-the-job training and intends to qualify for professional service with the Boy Scouts of America. See also "paraprofessional."

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
Encompasses the former northern and southern branches of Presbyterianism, which merged in 1983.

president
Capitalize only as a formal title before one or more names: "President Reagan," "Presidents Bush and Clinton." Lowercase in all other uses: "The president was ill today." "He is running for president." "Lincoln was president during the Civil War."

Specific BSA usages: (1) An elected volunteer executive. See "area president," "council president," and "regional president." There is also a national president of the BSA. (2) A Venturer elected by peers to this office conducts crew business.

Professional Circle
See "Professional Training Award."

Professional Development Levels 1, 2, and 3
Abbreviated as PD-L1, PD-L2, and PD-L3. See "Center for Professional Development."

professional Scouter
A registered, salaried, full-time employee who is commissioned to serve in an approved professional position in a local council or on the national staff by having successfully completed formal training (Professional Development Level 1, National Executive Institute, or National Training School), or who has been designated by the Chief Scout Executive as a member of the national management executive staff.

professional-technical (pro-tech) employee
A registered, full-time employee whose professional application has been approved by the Human Resources Administration Division to serve in a professional-technical position not requiring a professional commission, but designated and approved as having executive, administrative, or professional status.

professional trainee
A registered, full-time employee serving as a trainee in an approved entry-level professional position whose application for service as a professional Scouter has been approved by the Human Resources Administration Division and who has been assigned to a class at Professional Development Level 1.

Professional Training Award
Professional Scouters are eligible for this award and membership in the Professional Circle when certified by their Scout executives and the Professional Development Division as having fulfilled qualifications of basic and advanced training and tenure. See "square knot."

program
Generally lowercase: Cub Scout Academic and Sports program; BSA Family program. However, see specific program names in this guide. Also see "Scouting program."

program manager
A Varsity Scout who supervises one of the five program fields of emphasis: advancement, high adventure, personal development, service, and special programs and events.

Progress Toward Ranks beads
See "immediate recognition patch."

Project COPE
A Challenging Outdoor Personal Experience that may include problem-solving exercises, low-course activities (conducted from ground level to 6 feet above ground), and high-course events (several combined activities that require each participant to be belayed, conducted 30 feet or more above ground).

project selling
A fund-raising method of isolating specific budget items or projects for presentation to interested donors. "To project sell" may be used as a verb if needed.

promise
See "Cub Scout Promise" and "Scout Oath or Promise."

proportions
Always use figures: "2 parts powder to 6 parts water."

ProSpeak
This newsletter for all career men and women in the BSA is distributed monthly from the national office.

provisional unit
When individual Scouts or Venturers are to participate in an activity (such as a jamboree), they may be organized into temporary (provisional) troops, teams, or crews.

public relations committee
A volunteer advisory committee for the council and its districts charged with creating and maintaining a climate of public understanding and support.

punctuation
Think of punctuation as a courtesy to readers designed to help them understand what is written. Following are some rules and guidelines.

Quaker
See "Religious Society of Friends."

Qualified Seaman
See "Advanced Seamanship."

Quality awards
Recognition given each charter year to units and each calendar year to districts, councils, areas, and regions that commit to and meet specified national standards pertaining to leader training, service, advancement, camping, and membership growth. Examples: "The Quality Unit Award is given to Quality Units," "national Quality Unit Award."

Quality Lodge Award (Order of the Arrow)
See "Quality awards."

quartermaster
A youth officer in a troop, patrol, or Varsity Scout team who keeps the equipment in good shape and maintains an up-to-date inventory of it. In the troop, the quartermaster is appointed by the senior patrol leader with the Scoutmaster's advice and consent; in the patrol, he is appointed by the patrol leader.

Quartermaster
The highest rank in Sea Scouting, conferred with the Quartermaster Award.

Quest Award
The Quest Award is available to all Venturers. The goals of this sports and fitness award are to help Venturers have fun through experiencing a sport while properly trained, understand the role health and fitness play in sports, experience a variety of sports activities, and prepare to teach others.

quotations
When introducing quotations, do not use any punctuation to introduce a short partial quote; use a comma to introduce a direct quotation of one sentence; use a colon to introduce a quotation of longer than one sentence:

  • He said he "was tired."
  • He said, "I'm tired."
  • He said: "I'm tired. I want to go to sleep."

Capitalize the first word of a quoted statement: Patrick Henry said, "Give me liberty or give me death."

raingutter regatta
A pack activity that involves making and racing model boats. Combinations: "Pack 1 Raingutter Regatta," "the raingutter regatta."

ranger
See "camp ranger."

Ranger Award
The Venturing Ranger Award is available to all Venturers. The purpose of the award is to encourage Venturers to achieve high levels of outdoor skills proficiency and to provide a pathway for outdoor/high-adventure skills training. Once earned, the Ranger Award will identify a Venturer as someone who is skilled at a variety of outdoor sports and interest, is trained in outdoor safety, and is ready to assist others in activities.

ranges
The form: "$12 million to $14 million." Not: "$12 to $14 million."

rank
The six Cub Scout ranks are Bobcat, Tiger Cub, Wolf, Bear, Webelos, and Arrow of Light Award. There are six ranks for Boy Scouts and Varsity Scouts: Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle Scout. The Sea Scouting ranks are Apprentice, Ordinary, Able, and Quartermaster. Combinations: "First Class rank," "Star Scout."  They are never called awards.

ratios
Use figures and hyphens: "the ratio was 2-to-1," "a ratio of 2-to-1," "a 2-1 ratio." As illustrated, the word "to" should be omitted when the numbers precede the word "ratio." Always use the word "ratio" or a phrase such as "a 2-1 majority" to avoid confusion with actual figures.

recharter
Avoid the use of this term; use "to renew a charter." See "charter."

Red Arrow Award
A recognition given by the national Order of the Arrow committee to non-Arrowmen for outstanding service to the OA.

region
(1) One of four geographical administrative units of the BSA: Northeast Region, Southern Region, Central Region, and Western Region. There are regional service centers, regional directors, regional staffs, regional presidents, and regional committee members. (2) The World Organization of the Scout Movement has six regions. See "World Scout Bureau." Do not capitalize "region" when used alone. When referring to obsolete regional designations, use numerals: Region 2, Region 12.

regional committee
Consists of all National Council representatives (local council representatives and members at large), council presidents, and council commissioners in the region. Meets annually to elect regional officers.

regional president
The ranking elected volunteer officer in a region who heads the regional committee and cabinet and is an ex officio member of the National Executive Board.

regional staff
Professional Scouters on the national staff who work out of a regional service center. This includes the regional director, assistant regional directors, area directors, and associate regional directors.

registered member
Annually, every youth and adult who wants to join or continue membership in the Boy Scouts of America must submit a completed application form or reregister and pay an annual registration fee. Membership is a privilege, not a right. See "College Scouter Reserve," "Scouters' Reserve," "tenure," and "veteran."

relationships conference
A special meeting of heads of chartered organizations, chartered organization representatives, and council officers.

religious emblems program
Various religious organizations have designed requirements and procedures for participants in this Scouting program to earn the religious emblem of their faith.

Religious Principle, Declaration of
The Boy Scouts of America maintains that no person can grow into the best kind of citizen without recognizing an obligation to God and, therefore, acknowledges the religious element in the development of youth members. However, the BSA is absolutely nonsectarian in its attitude toward that religious development. Its policy is that the organization or institution with which youth members are connected shall give definite attention to their religious life. Only adults willing to subscribe to this declaration of principle and the Bylaws of the Boy Scouts of America shall be entitled to certificates of leadership.

Religious Society of Friends
The formal name for Quakers, which may be used in references to members of this denomination.

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
Obsolete term. The church changed its name in 2001 to Community of Christ. Not correctly described as a Mormon church.

Report to the Nation
The printed BSA annual Report to the Nation is presented to the president of the United States, both houses of Congress, and other government officials each February by a selected delegation of youth members and their advisers.

representative membership
When the youth membership in a council or district reflects proportionately the characteristics of that community's youth population.

resident camping
A council-organized, theme-oriented, overnight camping program for Cub Scouts or Webelos Scouts that operates for at least two nights and is conducted under trained leadership at a camp approved by the council.

retention
The term used to describe the percentage of boys who move from one phase of the Scouting program to another, such as from Cub Scouting into Boy Scouting.

rifle
See "firearms."

Roman numerals
They use letters ("I," "X," etc.) to express numbers. Use Roman numerals for wars and to establish personal sequence for people and animals: "World War I," "Native Dancer II," "King George V," "Pope John XXIII," "John Jones III." (Note: Do not precede the numeral by a comma.)

roundtable
An event conducted by a roundtable commissioner and roundtable staff to help the unit leadership of a district plan and carry out their own unit programs.

roundup
An organized fall recruiting plan during which members invite others to join a Scouting unit.

Rules and Regulations of the Boy Scouts of America
Article I of the Bylaws of the Boy Scouts of America states, "the [National] Executive Board may establish and amend Rules and Regulations for the further governance and guidance of the Boy Scouts of America including its local councils and affiliates." Italicize or underscore only if reference is obviously to the published booklet, Rules and Regulations of the Boy Scouts of America.

Rural Emphasis program
This program was merged with Urban Emphasis in 1998 to form the Scoutreach Division. See "Scoutreach Division."

Safe Boating
This course is designed for Sea Scout ships whose members may not be interested in following the advancement plan leading to Quartermaster, or as supplementary training for traditional ships. Those who complete the course earn the Small-Boat Handler bar. See "Advanced Seamanship."

safe haven
Do not use this term to describe or imply the atmosphere of a Scouting activity. Scouting strives to create an environment that is governed by the Scout Oath and Law where everyone should feel physically and emotionally secure.

Safe-Rides Venturing
A Safe-Rides Venturing crew provides a confidential ride home to any student who is not in a condition to drive. It also provides a ride home to those who wish to avoid being a passenger in such a situation. The safe-rides program can have a positive effect on young adults' attitudes about the dangers of using alcohol and drugs.

Safe Swim Defense plan
An eight-point plan of recommended procedures for conducting group swims. The eight points are (1) qualified supervision, (2) physical fitness, (3) safe area, (4) lifeguards on duty, (5) lookout, (6) ability groups, (7) buddy system, and (8) discipline.

Safety Afloat
Guidelines for safe unit activity afloat in craft less than 26 feet long: (1) qualified supervision, (2) physical fitness, (3) swimming ability, (4) personal flotation equipment, (5) buddy system, (6) skill proficiency, (7) planning, (8) equipment, and (9) discipline.

saint
Abbreviate as "St." in the names of saints, cities, and other places. Exceptions: Saint John (city in New Brunswick), Sault Ste. Marie (city in Michigan/Ontario), and the names of Scouting awards and emblems (e.g., Saint George Award).

Sakima
Sakima is a camp at S-F Scout Ranch.  Camp Sakima is named after Lief Sverdrup, Council President when the camp was dedicated in 1966. Sakima is a Lenni Lenape word for chief. 

salute
See "Cub Scout salute" and "Scout salute."

Salvation Army Scouter's Award
For Salvationists who give noteworthy service of exceptional character to the spiritual, moral, and physical development of youth through or in the Scouting program in The Salvation Army.

Salvation Army, The
Note the capitalization of "The" in the name of the group.

S bar F Scout Ranch
S-F Scout Ranch is a 5200 acre property located outside Knob Lick, MO.  The four camps located at S-F are Camp Sakima, Camp Famous Eagle, Camp Theodore R. Gamble and Swift Base.  The camps a located around the 270 acre Nims Lake.  Named for "Cubby" Baer of Stix, Baer & Fuller.  S-F was dedicated in September 1966. 

School Night for Scouting
A one-night event held in a neighborhood school, church, community center, etc., where boys and parents gather to hear how Cub Scouting and Boy Scouting operate and how they can join.

Scout
May be synonymous with the term "Boy Scout" or may be used to include Varsity Scouts and Boy Scouts (not Cub Scouts). Use on second reference or also in informal usage when the meaning is clearly understood. Capitalize "Scout" and all words beginning with "Scout" (such as "Scouting" and "Scouter") unless the meaning is not related to the Scouting movement.

Scout-a-Rama
This is incorrect; see "Scoutorama."

Scout benediction
May the Great Scoutmaster of all Scouts be with us until we meet again.

Scout executive
The chief executive officer of the council responsible for the administration, financing, marketing, motivation, recruiting, and staffing required for successful council operations. Capitalize only when the title precedes the name. Examples: "Scout Executive John Smiley," "John Smiley is the Scout executive."

Scout Executives' Alliance
A fellowship of professional and professional-technical Scouters that provides immediate funds to the family of a deceased member.

Scout handclasp
This unique greeting is given with the left hand, the thumb separated from the fingers.

Scout Law
A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent. (There are 12 points to the Scout Law.)

Scout motto
Be Prepared.

Scout Oath or Promise
On my honor I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; to help other people at all times; to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

Scout reservation or camp
Land owned by or leased to the Boy Scouts of America to further the Scouting program. A Scout reservation usually has two or more camps.

Scout Sabbath
The Saturday after February 8, Scouting Anniversary Day.

Scout salute
A hand salute made by Scouts and Scouters with the fingers of the right hand held in position as for the Scout sign.  The tip of the finger of the right hand touches the tip of the top of the right eyebrow.

Scout shop
A BSA-owned store, operated by the Supply Division, that sells official Scouting merchandise. See "Scouting distributor."

Scout show
See "Scouting show."

Scout sign
A sign made by raising the right hand palm forward, upper arm straight, and out to the side. The arm is bent at the elbow, forming a right angle. The three middle fingers are held erect and the thumb covers the nail of the little finger.

Scout slogan
Do a Good Turn Daily.

Scout Sunday
The Sunday before February 8, Scouting Anniversary Day.

Scoutcraft
Use "outdoor skills" in most cases, "Scouting skills" in others.

Scouter
A registered adult member of the Boy Scouts of America who serves in a volunteer or professional capacity.

Scouter's Award
The recognition for individuals who have not obtained the Scouter's Key but are trained and giving consistent service to Boy Scouting, Varsity Scouting, or Venturing or are serving on a roundtable/huddle staff. Scoutmasters also are required to earn the Scouter's Award as part of earning the Scoutmaster's Key.

Scouter's Key
Recognizes Scoutmasters, Coaches, Advisors, Skippers, commissioners, and district committee members who have taken the recommended training for these positions and have achieved a high standard of performance over three years.

Scouter's Training Award
See "Boy Scout Leader's Training Award."

Scouters' Reserve
A registration status for adults who want to remain identified with Scouting without a specific assignment. They may be called upon to help with short-term projects.

Scouting Anniversary Day
8 February, 1910, was the day William D. Boyce incorporated the Boy Scouts of America. Also called "Uniform Day."

Scouting Anniversary Week
This is the week, beginning on Sunday, that includes 8 February, Scouting Anniversary Day. During the week, units are encouraged to conduct rededication ceremonies and to demonstrate Scouting's purposeful activities.

Scouting coordinator
Former term for chartered organization representative. (See "chartered organization representative.")

Scouting distributor
A firm licensed by the Supply Division to stock and sell official Scouting merchandise. See "Scout shop."

Scouting Energy Day
A focus on energy education and conservation; held on the first Saturday of October, with activities continuing throughout the month.

Scouting Environment Day
This day highlights conservation awareness, the cleanup of litter, tree planting, and other conservation projects. Held annually on the fourth Saturday in April.

Scouting family
See "whole Scouting family" and "BSA Family program."

Scouting for Food National Good Turn
First conducted in November 1988, this nationwide food collection effort is BSA's response to the "unacceptable" of hunger in our society. See "unacceptables."

Scouting Heritage Society
Local council recognition program for those who have made a current or deferred gift to the council's endowment trust fund.

Scouting magazine
The official magazine for all Scouters. It aims to interpret the program, stimulate action, and strengthen a desire to serve. The title is typeset in italics and underlined in typewritten copy. The word "magazine" may or may not be used and is not capitalized.

Scouting movement
An idea started in England by Baden-Powell, based on the conviction that boys can live up to a code of conduct and can develop themselves physically, mentally, and spiritually in association with other boys through a program of appealing activities and advancement challenges under the leadership of adults.

Scouting program
Historically, "Scouting" has been the generic term for the organization and activities of the Boy Scouts of America. It refers also to Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, and troop and team activities. The program of the Boy Scouts of America is designed to fulfill its chartered purpose to achieve objectives in character development, citizenship training, and fitness adapted to the age groups: Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, and Venturers. The program is carried out in units run by local organizations chartered by the Boy Scouts of America. Do not refer to Cub Scouting, Tiger Cubs BSA, Boy Scouting, Varsity Scouting, and Venturing as separate programs.

Scouting show
Not "Scout show" unless only Boy Scouts and no Cub Scouts, Varsity Scouts, or Venturers are involved. See also "arena show" and "booth show."

Scoutmaster
A volunteer Scouter, 21 or older, appointed by the chartered organization to lead a Boy Scout troop.

Scoutmaster Award of Merit
See "National President's Scoutmaster Award of Merit."

Scoutmaster conference
A distinctive feature of the troop advancement plan in which a Scoutmaster helps a Scout accept the responsibility for his own growth toward each rank.

Scoutmaster's Key
A recognition given to a Scoutmaster for completing training, tenure, and performance requirements.

Scoutmaster's Minute
A part of the closing ceremony of a troop meeting or campfire in which the Scoutmaster encourages Scoutlike conduct by telling a story.

Scoutmastership Fundamentals
Obsolete. See "leader-specific training."

ScoutNET
A wide area network that electronically connects all local councils, regional offices, the National Distribution Center, the Center for Professional Development, and the national office.

Scoutorama
A show or demonstration of Scouting activities.

Scoutreach Division
Formed from the merger of the Urban Emphasis and Rural Emphasis programs in 1998, the division gives special leadership and emphasis to urban and rural Scouting. Scoutreach represents the BSA's commitment to making sure that all young people have an opportunity to join Scouting, regardless of their circumstances, neighborhood, or ethnic background.

Scouts with disabilities/Scouts with special needs
A program element of the Boy Scouts of America that emphasizes the involvement of youth who have visual, hearing, or other physical disabilities, or are emotionally disturbed or mentally retarded. An alternative advancement program is available for these youth members. They can be mainstreamed into regular Scouting units or placed in a special unit organized to meet their special needs. See "Torch of Gold Award," and "Woods Services Award."

Scouts' Own
Discontinue the use this term for a worship service at camp. Instead, use "outdoor worship service" or "interfaith worship service."

scribe
A youth officer who checks attendance and keeps records. The troop scribe is appointed by the senior patrol leader with the Scoutmaster's advice and consent. The patrol scribe is appointed by the patrol leader.

Scuba BSA
A recognition given to Scouts and Venturers who demonstrate knowledge and skill in the sport of scuba diving.

Sea Scout
A registered youth member of a Sea Scout ship.

Sea Scout Leaders' Specialized Training
This special course provides an introduction to Sea Scouting for all Sea Scout leaders.

Sea Scouting
Sea Scouts specialize in traditional nautical activities, i.e., sailing, boating, and maritime careers.

Sea Scouting committee
A committee responsible to the council Venturing committee chair. This committee encourages intership activities, renews charters for ships, and encourages periodic meetings of ship officers. It also supports program and provides training.

Seabadge
Adult training recognition in Sea Scouting. The Seabadge conference is an advanced training conference for Sea Scout leaders conducted on a council or regional basis.

seasons
Lowercase "spring," "summer," "fall," and "winter" unless part of a formal name: "Summer Olympics," "St. Paul Winter Carnival."

Second Class
The rank above Tenderfoot in Boy Scout and Varsity Scout advancement. Combinations: "Second Class Scout," "Second Class rank."

secretary
A Varsity Scout or Venturer elected to this office in the team or crew.

section
Geographical and administrative grouping of Order of the Arrow lodges.

see'n'do
A one-day activity to recognize Scoutmasters and stimulate use of the Boy Scout Handbook. Provides public exposure for Boy Scouting and stimulates interest in members and nonmembers. Do not capitalize unless naming a specific see'n'do, as "Apache District See'n'Do."

Seeboomook Base
Formerly part of the Maine National High Adventure Area; no longer used on a national level.

self-
Always hyphenate: "self-reliant," "self-esteem," "self-worth," "self-conscious."

semiannual
Twice a year; a synonym for "biannual."

semicolon
See "punctuation."

senior patrol leader
Each troop has one senior patrol leader, a Scout elected by the Scouts to help all the patrols succeed. He may be assisted by one or more assistant senior patrol leaders.

service
(1) Denotes tenure. Example: "He has two years' service as a Scouter." Expresses the function of an office. Example: "Commissioner service is to help units succeed." (2) Used to describe the Good Turn ideal. Example: "The Boy Scouts of America has performed outstanding service to the country." (3) An administrative branch of a National Council division. Examples: "Jamboree Service," "Audiovisual Service."

service center
The business office for a council or region. Combinations: "Longhorn Council Service Center," "local council or regional service center," "Western Region Service Center."

service patrol
The name given to a patrol that has accepted an extra work assignment for the good of the troop.

service star
An insignia worn over the left shirt pocket of the uniform to denote number of years of service.

Seton Memorial Library and Philmont Museum
Located at Philmont Scout Ranch, this facility contains exhibits related to the history and program of the ranch and the Southwest as well as a library of books, art, and artifacts of one of the BSA's founders, Ernest Thompson Seton.

ship
The unit that conducts Sea Scouting for the chartered organization. Equivalent to a Venturing crew. Combinations: "Sea Scout ship," "Ship 38," "Sea Scout Ship 38."

ships and spacecraft
Italicize the names of ships (the Titanic) and spacecraft (the Discovery) unless you are referring to a spacecraft that is named after a part of the space program, such as Apollo 13. Lowercase "space shuttle." Do not italicize abbreviations that appear before the name of a ship, such as SS or HMS: SS United States.

short-term camping
A camping experience consisting of one to four days and at least one night outdoors.

shotgun
See "weapons."

showando
An outdoor event—"showing and doing"—that helps a leader blend leadership skills with outdoor and camping skills.

Silver Antelope Award
A recognition given by the National Court of Honor to a Scouter for distinguished service to youth within the region.

Silver Arrow Point
See "Arrow Point."

Silver Award
The Silver Award is available to all Venturers. Its purpose is to provide a pathway for personal development; encourage Venturers to learn, grow and serve; and recognize the high level of achievement of Venturers who acquire Venturing skills. Candidates must first achieve at least one Bronze Award and the Venturing Gold Award.

Silver Beaver Award
A recognition given by the National Court of Honor for distinguished service to youth within the council.

Silver Buffalo Award
A recognition given by the National Court of Honor for distinguished service to youth on the national level.

Silver Palm
See "Eagle Palms."

Silver World Award
Presented by the BSA to citizens of other countries and to U.S. citizens who are not BSA members, for distinguished service to youth on an international level.

Skipper
The Sea Scouting equivalent of Advisor. Assisted by a "mate."

slogan
See "Scout slogan."

Small-Boat Handler
A Sea Scout who successfully completes the Safe Boating course earns this emblem.

Snorkeling BSA
A recognition given to Scouts and Venturers to encourage the development of aquatic skills that promote fitness and recreation and to lay a foundation for those who later participate in advanced underwater activities.

space derby
A pack activity that involves making and racing model spaceships. Combinations: "Pack 1 Space Derby," "the space derby."

spacecraft
See "ships and spacecraft."

speeds
Use figures. "The car slowed to 7 miles per hour," "the car slowed to 7 mph," "winds of 5 to 10 knots."

Spirit of the Eagle Award
A posthumous recognition for youth members who died as a result of accident or illness. Awarded by the National Court of Honor.

spouse
Use when some of the people involved may be men. For example: "Scouters and their spouses," not "Scouters and their wives."

squad
A Varsity Scout team subdivision that consists of four to eight members; equivalent to a patrol in a Boy Scout troop.

squad leader
Elected by squad members, this Varsity Scout leads the squad and, with other team members, develops team meeting agendas.

square knot
Generally, embroidered square knots are representative of pin-on medals or around-the-neck awards and are designed for the greater convenience of the wearer. They are the only wearable insignia for the Award of Merit and Professional Training Award. Embroidered knots from other Scout associations may be worn on Scouters' uniforms.

standard time
Capitalize "Eastern Standard Time," "Pacific Standard Time," etc., but lowercase "standard time" standing alone. See also "times and time zones."

Star
The rank above First Class and below Life in Scout advancement. Combinations: "Star Scout," "Star rank."

state
Lowercase in all "state of" constructions: "the state of Iowa," "the states of Maine and Vermont."

state names
Spell out the names of U.S. states unless space is a factor (such as in the Trailblazers section of ProSpeak or in tabular material), and then use the standard abbreviations shown in the "Abbreviations" section of this manual. Use the two-letter postal abbreviations in addresses with zip codes only. Punctuation: Place a comma between the city and state name, and another comma after the state name: "He traveled from Chicago, Illinois, to Dallas, Texas, en route to his home in Flagstaff, Arizona."

Strategic Plan, National
A three- to five-year plan that helps provide a focus for the growth and success of Scouting. Also see "critical issues." Capitalize when referring to the BSA's National Strategic Plan; council strategic plans should be lowercase.

Summertime Pack Award
See "National Summertime Pack Award."

sun
Lowercase: "The sun is hot today."

superactivity
A major annual activity, trip, or project of a Venturing crew requiring long-range planning and extensive preparation. Generally the highlight of the crew's program year.

supplemental training
A variety of courses given on a district, council, area, regional, or national basis designed to give additional information on specific areas of Cub Scouting, Boy Scouting, Varsity Scouting, and Venturing. Other terms include "pow wow," "leadership update," "unit leadership enhancements," and "Webelos Leader Outdoor Training."

Supply Division
The arm of the Boy Scouts of America that supplies official uniforms, equipment, and literature to the field. Includes administrative offices located in the national office, a national distribution center, and Scout shops located nationwide.

Supreme Court of the United States
Capitalize "U.S. Supreme Court." Capitalize "the Supreme Court" when the context makes the "U.S." designation unnecessary.

sustaining member
Obsolete term; see "Friends of Scouting."

Sustaining Membership Enrollment
An obsolete term, SME was once used to describe a special type of membership for people who want to be identified with a local council for their financial support through the annual Friends of Scouting campaign. See "Friends of Scouting," which is the correct term.

swimmer test
The minimum level of swimming ability required for deep-water swimming. The test is as follows: Jump feetfirst into water over the head in depth, swim 75 yards in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke, breaststroke, trudgen, or crawl; then swim 25 yards using an easy resting backstroke. The 100 yards must be swum continuously and include at least one sharp turn. After completing the swim, rest by floating.

tap-out ceremony
The ceremony that begins the membership induction process for a newly elected Order of the Arrow candidate. Can use "tapout" on subsequent references.  This refers to the Indian who "taps" the new candidate to signify that he has been chosen.

TAY
See "total available youth."

team
(1) A stand-alone unit that conducts Varsity Scouting for the chartered organization. (2) A Tiger Cub and his adult partner.

temperatures
Use figures for all temperatures except "zero." Generally, the Fahrenheit temperature scale is presumed if Centigrade is not specified. Spell out "degrees" rather than use the symbol: "During the day it got up to 100 degrees"; "the temperature was below zero"; "32 degrees Centigrade." Also see "Centigrade" and "Fahrenheit."

Tenderfoot
The first rank in the Boy Scout advancement program. Always singular. Example: "Boys must pass Tenderfoot requirements before they can become Tenderfoot Scouts."

tenure
A term used to describe the length of service and membership in Scouting. See "veteran."

three R's
Traditionally, they are "reading, 'riting, and 'rithmetic." In Scouting, the three R's of Youth Protection are recognize, resist, and report. See "Youth Protection."

Tiger Cub
A boy who is in the first grade (or is 7 years old) and registered, with his adult partner, as a member of a Tiger Cub den.

Tiger Cub den
A den of five to eight Tiger Cubs and their adult partners. Part of a Cub Scout pack. No longer called a "Tiger Cub group."

Tiger Cubs BSA
Obsolete. This was a one-year, family-oriented program for a group of teams, each consisting of a first-grade (or 7-year-old) boy (Tiger Cub) and an adult partner (usually his parent). The Tiger Cub den is now part of the Cub Scout pack. See "Cub Scouting" and "Scouting."

times and time zones
Use figures, except for "noon" and "midnight": 11 A.M. (not 11:00), 3:30 P.M. Use small caps for A.M. and P.M. Time zones and their abbreviations: Eastern Standard Time (EST), Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), Central Standard Time (CST), Central Daylight Time (CDT), Mountain Standard Time (MST), Mountain Daylight Time (MDT), Pacific Standard Time (PST), Pacific Daylight Time (PDT). Capitalize the full name of the time zone, but lowercase all but the region in short forms: "Pacific time," "the Central time zone."

titles with names
In general, confine capitalization to formal titles used directly before an individual's name: "District Executive Karla Wallace"; "Karla was a district executive." An exception is Chief Scout Executive, which is always capitalized. See also "capitalization" and "composition titles."

Together Dinner
An obsolete term. Use "new-unit campaign dinner."

Together We Organize or Together plan
Now called the new-unit campaign.

Top Hands conference
The plan of action for the BSA's future direction is crafted in these meetings of Scout executives and regional and national personnel.

Torch of Gold Award
For local council use in recognizing adults for outstanding service to youth with disabilities.

total available youth (TAY)
The number of youth in an area who meet BSA membership requirements.

Totin' Chip
A recognition given to Scouts who subscribe to the Outdoor Code and understand and can demonstrate the proper handling, care, and use of woods tools.

tour permit
Permit designed to (1) assist units in planning to assure safe, healthful, and enjoyable trips and (2) assure that proper procedures will be followed in case of emergency. A local tour permit is filed with the council for a trip of less than 500 miles. A national tour permit is filed with the region through the council for a trip of 500 miles or more.

trademarks
When possible, use a generic equivalent for a trademarked name unless the trademark is essential. Some common examples: "adhesive bandage" rather than Band-Aid; "polystyrene plastic foam" (or "plastic foam") rather than Styrofoam; "chocolate bar" rather than Hershey bar; "tissue" rather than Kleenex; "resealable sandwich bag" rather than Ziploc bag; "flying disk" rather than Frisbee. When a trademark is used, capitalize it. A useful Trademark Checklist with generic equivalents from the International Trademark Association is available online at www.inta.org; you can call the ITA hotline at 212-768-9886, 2-5 P.M. Eastern time.

trading post
The camp or reservation store where equipment and supplies may be purchased by campers. A distributor's Scouting department is sometimes referred to as the trading post.

TRAIL Boss
TRAIL (Teaching Resources And Individual Leadership) Bosses are Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, and Venturers who have learned how to lead volunteers completing environmental work on public lands. Upon completion of the requirements, candidates may receive the TRAIL Boss patch and certificate.

train-the-trainer conference
In this conference, the people responsible for training unit leaders become acquainted with the principles, methods, and techniques of training. The conference is held by the council or a cluster of councils. Do not capitalize unless giving the name of a specific conference: "Viking Council Train-the-Trainer Conference."

Trained Leader emblem
This emblem may be worn by all leaders, youth and adult, who have completed the Fast Start and basic training programs appropriate to their positions. It may be worn only in connection with the emblem of office for which training has been completed.

Treasure Island
A Scout camp belonging to the Philadelphia Council; the Order of the Arrow was founded there in July 1915.

treasurer
(1) A Varsity Scout or Venturer elected to be responsible for funds in the team or crew. (2) A Boy Scout who keeps a record of patrol dues and makes up a budget for patrol outings; appointed by the patrol leader.

Trek Safely
The BSA's recommended procedure for unit outings involving all types of trekking, including backpacking, canoeing, rafting, horse packing, bicycling, mountain climbing, and sailing. The seven points—qualified supervision, keep fit, plan ahead, gear up, communicate, and discipline—help ensure the safety and well-being of participants.

trial rate
Raising the percentage of eligible boys who try Scouting (the trial rate) is the aim of this comprehensive marketing campaign of the BSA.

troop
The unit that conducts Boy Scouting for the chartered organization. Capitalize only when used with the troop number. Combinations: "Boy Scout troop," "Troop 14."

troop guide
A youth leader who works with Scouts in the new-Scout patrol; appointed by the Scoutmaster in consultation with the assistant Scoutmaster responsible for new Scouts.

troop historian
This youth leader records the troop's activities both in writing and visually; appointed by the senior patrol leader with the Scoutmaster's advice and consent.

Troop Leadership Training
The first course in the youth leadership training continuum; designed to be conducted frequently in a troop setting whenever there are new Scouts or there has been a shift in leadership positions within the patrol or troop.

troop open house
Same as "troop rally night."

troop rally night
A coordinated council or district membership effort using volunteers and professionals in which boys are identified through a boy-fact survey and referred to troops. The program at a troop rally night should be aimed to sell Scouting to prospective Scouts.

troop resource survey
A survey of the talents, skills, and interests of adults who could provide program assistance to the troop.

troop site
A campsite on council property used by a Boy Scout troop; it contains several patrol sites.

12 Core Values
The 12 Core Values of Cub Scouting are citizenship, compassion, cooperation, courage, faith, health and fitness, honesty, perseverance, positive attitude, resourcefulness, respect, and responsibility.

ultimate
A team sport played with a flying disk (such as a Frisbee). See "Cub Scout Academics and Sports program."

unacceptables
Drug abuse, child abuse, hunger, illiteracy, and youth unemployment in our society are unacceptable to the BSA, which is fighting them with the Drugs: A Deadly Game campaign; Youth Protection guidelines and child abuse educational literature and videos; the Scouting for Food National Good Turn; Boys' Life magazine and other high-quality literature designed to encourage youth to read; and the merit badge program; as well as by continuing to be vigorous in promoting the Scouting program, which builds character in youth and helps them prepare for a meaningful, productive adult life.

under way
Two words in virtually all uses: "The project is under way." "The naval maneuvers are under way." It is one word only when used as an adjective before a noun in a nautical sense: "an underway ship."

uniform
A distinctive part of Scouting is its uniformed membership. Combinations: "Varsity Scout uniform," "dress uniform," "field uniform," "Scouter uniform," and "Sea Scout uniform."

Uniform Day
February 8. See "Scouting Anniversary Day."

uniform inspection
A feature of a unit meeting when members of the registered unit are given an opportunity to demonstrate their uniformed appearance.

unit
The entity that conducts Scouting for the chartered organization; it consists of registered youth members and registered adult volunteer members. A unit may be a pack, troop, team, crew, or ship. Its affairs are administered by the unit committee, which is appointed by the chartered organization.

unit leader
The adult leader of a unit is a Cubmaster, Scoutmaster, Coach, Advisor, or Skipper.

Unit Leadership Enhancements
Supplemental training that takes place in the Cub Scout pack and is conducted by a member of the pack committee.

unit-serving executive
See "youth-serving executive."

United Church of Christ
The Evangelical and Reformed Church merged with the Congregational Christian Church in 1957 to form the United Church of Christ.

United Methodist Church
The principal Methodist body in the United States, formed in 1968 by the merger of the Methodist Church and the Evangelist United Brethren Church.

United States
Spell out when used as a noun; use "U.S." (no space) only as an adjective: "I live in the United States"; "I'm a U.S. citizen."

United States Foundation for International Scouting
An independent nonprofit corporation whose purpose is to secure funds and help finance Scouting projects around the world. Gifts to the USFIS are deductible as charitable contributions.

United Way of America
An umbrella agency representing the interests of many social and welfare organizations; formed to raise operating expenses through annual campaigns conducted in local communities.

universal Scout badge
A miniature Tenderfoot insignia. Often worn on civilian clothes by Scouters.

Urban Emphasis program
Combined with the Rural Emphasis program in 1998 to form the Scoutreach Division. See "Scoutreach Division."

Varsity
Sports activities in a Varsity Scout team (not in a troop). See "Varsity Scouting" and "Venture."

Varsity Scout
A young man who is a registered youth member of a Varsity Scout team.

Varsity Scout team
A stand-alone unit that conducts Varsity Scouting for the chartered organization.

Varsity Scouting
A part of the program of the Boy Scouts of America for young men (Varsity Scouts) who are at least 14 but not yet 18 years old. The unit is a team; the unit leader is a Coach. Emphasis is on advancement, high adventure, personal development, service, and special programs and events. See "Scouting program" and "Varsity."

Velcro
Trademark term for a fabric fastener. Use the generic term unless clarity would suffer.

Venture
High-adventure activities for a patrol (Venture patrol) of Boy Scouts age 13 and older in a troop. Do not refer to these Boy Scouts as Venture Scouts. This is different from Venturing. See "Venturing."

Venture patrol
A patrol of Boy Scouts age 13 and older in a troop; the patrol participates in high-adventure activities. This is different from a Venturing crew. See "Venturing crew."

Venturer
A registered youth member of a Venturing crew. The word "Venturer" should be used only as a noun referring to a youth member. Use "Venturing" when a modifier is needed. The forms: "One Venturer built a kayak." "One member of the Venturing crew built a kayak." Venturing is different from the Boy Scout Venture program. See "Venture."

Venturing
The young adult program of the Boy Scouts of America for men and women 14 (who have completed the eighth grade) through 20 years of age. "Venturing" is both a noun and a modifier. The forms: "Venturing is a program for young adults." "Young women and men take part in Venturing activities." "Good Venturing Advisors are crucial to successful Venturing crews." Venturing is different from the Boy Scout Venture program. See "Venture."

Venturing activity interest survey
An annual survey of the career and leisure interests of high school students conducted by the local council. Survey results may be available to help crews recruit new members.

Venturing Code
I believe that America's strength lies in our trust in God and in the courage, strength, and traditions of our people. I will, therefore, be faithful in my religious duties and will maintain a personal sense of honor in my own life. I will treasure my American heritage and will do all I can to preserve and enrich it. I will recognize the dignity and worth of all humanity and will use fair play and goodwill in my daily life. I will acquire the Venturing attitude that seeks truth in all things and adventure on the frontiers of our changing world.

Venturing crew
Youth members and adult leaders who conduct the Venturing program within an organization chartered by the BSA. This is different from a Venture patrol. See "Venture patrol."

Venturing Impact Plan
A council organizational plan to "sell" business, industry, labor, professional, church, and community groups to organize Venturing crews.

Venturing Oath
As a Venturer, I promise to do my duty to God and help strengthen America, to help others, and to seek truth, fairness, and adventure in our world.

Venturing program conference
Conducted by many councils to provide program support and training to Venturing leaders. The Advisor, associate Advisors, president, and vice presidents from each crew attend.

veteran
A recognition status accorded to members of Scouting who have served five years or more. Combinations: "10-year veteran," "15-year veteran," "20-year veteran." Units also achieve veteran status and may display veteran insignia on their flags and uniforms.

Veterans Day
No apostrophe.

Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Wood Badge Scholarship
This scholarship assists selected VFW members in acquiring youth-serving skills. Annually, 12 scholarships are given-three per region.

vice chairman
A National Council, local council, district, or unit committee title.

vice president
(1) An adult volunteer elected position in the National Council or a local council. (2) An elected youth position in a Venturing crew.

Vigil Honor
The highest honor the Order of the Arrow can bestow upon its members, for service to the lodge, council, and Scouting.

vision statement
See "BSA Vision Statement."

volunteer
Individual who donates service, time, or funds to support the program of the Boy Scouts of America.

volunteer service
The work of men and women throughout the country who make Scouting available to youth by their service at all levels of the Scouting organization—all done without pay. The voting members of the council are volunteer Scouters.

wagonmaster
A campmaster for Cub Scout family camping programs. See also "campmaster."

Washington
Never abbreviate when referring to the U.S. capital. Use "state of Washington" or "Washington state" and "Washington, D.C.," or "District of Columbia" when the context requires distinction between the state and the federal district.

Web
Short for the World Wide Web.

Web site
Two words; capitalize the word "Web" only.

Web sites, BSA

  • www.scouting.org. The official Web site of the Boy Scouts of America.
  • www.boyslife.org. The Web site of Boys' Life magazine contains information about the current issue, games to play, projects to download, and more.
  • www.bsafieldbook.org. This is a companion site to the BSA's Fieldbook.
  • www.bsalegal.org. This site was developed on behalf of the Boy Scouts of America to inform the public about the issues that confront the Scouting movement.
  • www.bsamuseum.org. The official Web site of the National Scouting Museum.
  • www.bsaseabase.org. The Web site of the Florida National High Adventure Sea Base.
  • www.goodturnforamerica.org. This is a support resource site for the Good Turn for America initiative.
  • www.joincubscouting.org. Provides information about Cub Scouting to prospective members, including boys, parents, and organizations that may be interested in starting a pack.
  • www.ntier.org. The Web site of the Northern Tier National High Adventure Bases.
  • www.olc.org. The Online Learning Center provides a variety of materials, from quick references to complete courses, all designed to help our members improve leadership skills and deliver a quality program.
  • www.scoutingfriends.org. An official BSA Web site where former members can reconnect with Scouting and stay informed about the activities and programs at their local councils.
  • www.scoutingmagazine.org. The Scouting magazine Web site contains a complete archive of past editions going back to 1998.
  • www.scoutingvalelapena.org. The official Spanish-language Web site of the Boy Scouts of America.
  • www.scoutreachbsa.org. Provides information and support for local efforts to ensure that all young people, regardless of their circumstances, neighborhood, or ethnic background, have an opportunity to join Scouting.
  • www.scoutstuff.org. BSA's official online source for camping equipment, uniforms, handbooks, pinewood derby supplies, and other essential Scouting merchandise.
  • www.stlbsa.org. The Web site for the Greater St. Louis Area Council.
  • www.stlesa.org. This site has information about the Eagle Scout Association, including a section for ESA members.
  • www.soccerandscouting.org. The Web site that supports the Soccer and Scouting program.
  • www.thescoutzone.org. This site provides information about Boy Scouting to prospective members.
  • www.toothoftimetraders.org. Philmont's Scout Ranch's online trading post.

Webelos badge
The fifth rank in Cub Scouting; earned by Webelos Scouts in a Webelos den.

Webelos den
A group of Webelos Scouts who meet weekly under the supervision of a Webelos den leader.

Webelos den chief
A Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or Venturer who has been appointed to help direct the activities of a Webelos den.

Webelos den leader
A registered volunteer member, age 21 or older, appointed by the pack committee to plan and direct the den's activities.

Webelos Den Leader Award
An award available to Webelos den leaders for completing requirements of tenure, training, and performance.

Webelos denner
A Webelos Scout who is elected by other members of his den to help the Webelos den chief.

Webelos Leader Outdoor Training
A supplemental training experience conducted by the district or council to provide Webelos leaders with the skills needed to conduct den parent-son overnight camping.

Webelos resource person
The assistant Scoutmaster who serves as liaison between the troop and the Webelos den.

Webelos Scout
(Pronounced WEE-buh-los.) A Cub Scout who has completed the third grade or is age 10 but has not yet completed fifth grade or reached age 11 1/2, and is a member of a Webelos den. The word "Webelos" (means WE'll BE LOyal Scouts) should always be used as a modifier, never as a noun.

Webelos Scout overnighter
A one- or two-night campout by Webelos Scouts and their adult partners.

Webelos-to-Scout transition plan
The preparation and graduation of a Webelos Scout from Cub Scouting to Boy Scouting. Use instead of "Webelos-to-Scout transition," which is obsolete.

Webelos Woods
An activity designed to introduce Webelos Scouts, each with an adult family member, to the many outdoor adventures of Boy Scouting.

weights
Use figures: "The baby weighed 9 pounds, 7 ounces." "He caught a 9-pound, 7-ounce fish."

white
Although "black" is generally preferred to the use of "African American," "white" is still appropriate for describing race. Avoid the use of "European American" or "Caucasian."  Always avoid the use of "xxx American".

Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award
Presented to volunteer Scouters or organizations who have made an outstanding contribution through Scouting to rural or low-income urban youth.

whole Scouting family
When an organization is chartered to operate a Cub Scout pack, a Boy Scout troop, a Varsity Scout team, and a Venturing crew, it is said to have the whole Scouting family. Also called "full family of Scouting."

-wide
Do not use a hyphen: councilwide, districtwide, areawide.

wide area network
No hyphen.

Wilderness Commitment
Those who make the Wilderness Commitment follow the Outdoor Code and the Wilderness Pledge.

Wilderness Pledge
Through good camping and hiking practices, I pledge myself to preserve the beauty and splendor of America's wilderness, primitive and backcountry areas
I commit myself to:
Set a personal example in following the Outdoor Code.
Train those I lead in the skills and attitudes needed to protect and preserve wilderness for future generations.
Assure that parties of which I am part observe the hiking and camping standards that will "leave no trace" of our passing.

Wilderness Use Policy
An official policy that outlines the size limit, skill level, and conduct of any Scouting group going into backcountry or wilderness areas. The objective is to minimize the effect such groups have on those delicate areas. See "Leave No Trace."

William T. Hornaday Award
The William T. Hornaday Award is presented for distinguished service in conservation. The award is given in one of six forms: The local council may give the William T. Hornaday certificate for a unique conservation project by a pack, troop, team, or crew. The council may also award the William T. Hornaday badge to individual Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, and Venturers for outstanding service in conservation. All other Hornaday Awards are conferred by the National Council; Scouts and Venturers may apply for the bronze and silver medals, and local councils may nominate Scouters for the gold medal and individuals and organizations for the gold certificate.

Winners' Circle
See "Chief Scout Executive's Winners' Circle."

woggle
See "Wood Badge."

Wolf
The rank designed for a second-grade or 8-year-old Cub Scout. Combinations: "Wolf achievements," "Wolf Cub Scout," "Wolf electives," "Wolf rank."

Wood Badge
Training award granted upon completion of the Wood Badge course. A leather thong with two wooden beads, a special neckerchief, and a slide (woggle) are worn by those who have completed the training. See also "Gilwell Park." Tantamount to getting a doctorate in Boy Scouting.

Woods Services Award
A national recognition for exceptional service and leadership to Scouts with disabilities.

woods tools
Those tools, including knife, ax, and saw, used by Boy Scouts and Scouters carrying out outdoor skills and related advancement requirements.

word-of-mouth
(n.

World Brotherhood Exchange
Through this International Division program, a troop may offer home hospitality to a patrol of Scouts from another country, and have the patrol join the troop in activities and camping.

world brotherhood of Scouting

World Conservation Award
An award emphasizing the importance of our natural resources and our interdependence with other countries in our world environment. Two awards are offered-one for Cub Scouts and one for Boy Scouts.

World Crest
This emblem may be worn by all members as an expression of world brotherhood.

World Friendship Fund
The means by which Scouts and Scouters in the United States of America may provide material help to Scouts and Scouting around the world. See "Baden-Powell World Fellowship."

world jamboree
See "jamboree."

World Organization of the Scout Movement
An international, nongovernmental organization that is composed of three principle parts: the World Scout Conference, the World Scout Committee, and the World Scout Bureau.

World Scout Bureau
The secretariat that carries out the instructions of the World Scout Conference and the World Scout Committee. The head office is in Geneva, Switzerland, and regional offices are in Chile, Egypt, Kenya, the Philippines, Switzerland, and Ukraine.

World Scout Committee
The executive body that represents the World Scout Conference between meetings. There are 12 committee members from 12 countries; they are elected for terms of six years. The members represent the interests of Scouting as a whole and not their own countries.

World Scout Conference
Meeting every three years, this is the general assembly of Scouting that is composed of delegates from each of the member Scout organizations. If there is more than one Scout association in a country, a federation must be formed for world membership.

World Scout Foundation
Contributions to this foundation are invested permanently to produce regular income for the benefit of the World Organization of the Scout Movement. See "Baden-Powell World Fellowship."

World Scout Jamboree

World Scout Parliamentary Union

World Scouting flag

World Scouting News
This monthly bulletin, published by the World Organization of the Scout Movement, contains Scouting news items from around the world.

World Wide Web, the Web, Web site

worship, worshipped, worshipping, worshipper
AP style changed in June 1997 to the use of the double "p" shown here.

years
Use figures, without commas: "1975." Use an s without an apostrophe to indicate spans of decades or centuries: "the 1890s," "the 1800s." Years are the lone exception to the general rule in numerals that a figure is not used to start a sentence: "1910 saw the founding of the Boy Scouts of America." However, it may be better to recast the sentence to avoid this exception.

Young American Awards
These local council awards may be given annually to young adults between the ages of 15 and 25 who have achieved excellence in the fields of science, religion, service, government, business, athletics, art, music, or literature. Recipients need not be members of the Boy Scouts of America.

youth leader training
See "National Youth Leader Instructor Camp" and "National Youth Leadership Training."

youth ministry outreach
Used to describe how the Scouting program is used within a religious organization.

Youth Protection program
This BSA emphasis fights child abuse by teaching youth the "three R's": Recognize, Resist, and Report child abuse; by helping parents and Scouters learn to recognize indications of child abuse; and by teaching them how to handle child abuse situations.

youth-serving executive
A Scouting professional who serves the council at the unit level. Note the use of the hyphen.

zip code
Lowercase, even though it is an acronym for Zone Improvement Plan. Do not put a comma between the zip code and the state abbreviation in addresses.

Zoroastrianism
A Persian religion founded in the sixth century.

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Troop 630, B.S.A.
Christ, Prince of Peace Parish
415 Weidman Rd
Manchester MO 63011-4431
636.391.1307
www.ChristPrinceOfPeace.com